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Temblor clay shale

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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1941
AAPG Bulletin (1941) 25 (7): 1327-1342.
... and breccia. The gouge, which is 20 feet thick in places, is composed of limonitic clay, carrying shale fragments, and it is overlain by as much as 6 feet of brecciated crystalline rock in those localities where the pre-Cretaceous metamorphic rocks form the base of the thrust cover. After having learned...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1942
AAPG Bulletin (1942) 26 (10): 1608-1631.
... within the landslide, under a combined Temblor-Vaqueros caption. In situ Temblor-Vaqueros formation .—The oldest rocks in place in this part of the Temblor Range comprise buff-gray sandstones with minor intercalations of brown siltstone and clay shale. These beds crop out along the crest...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1930
AAPG Bulletin (1930) 14 (10): 1321-1336.
...FRITZ E. VON ESTORFF ABSTRACT The Kreyenhagen shale at the type locality overlies with seeming conformity the Domengine (upper middle Eocene) sandstone and is overlain unconformably by beds of Temblor (lower middle Miocene) age. The Kreyenhagen is composed of shale of the kind generally...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1933
AAPG Bulletin (1933) 17 (1): 1-15.
... Etchegoin formation .—Near the beginning of Pliocene time, submergence of the Temblor Range area was again resumed. Pliocene conglomerates, sands, and clays in variable succession accumulated, and successively higher strata overlapped westward upon the eroded edges of the Miocene diatomaceous shales...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1941
AAPG Bulletin (1941) 25 (2): 193-262.
..., though Louderback 11 early called attention to evidence of the principle involved. There is a tendency to think of the Vaqueros as having been a time of universal sand, the Temblor of alternate sand and shale, and the Monterey of universal shale deposition because their types (which are merely local...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1982
AAPG Bulletin (1982) 66 (10): 1689-1690.
...John R. Gilbert ABSTRACT The upper Miocene, late Mohnian age, Williams Sand crops out in the southeastern Temblor Range along the southwest margin of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California. The Williams is composed of lenses of generally coarse material within the siliceous Antelope Shale...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1951
AAPG Bulletin (1951) 35 (8): 1727-1780.
... this are the Matilija sandstone, Cozy Dell shale, and “Coldwater sandstone,”—all upper Eocene in age, and all previously described by others. The Oligocene is represented by the non-marine Sespe formation, and the Miocene rocks include “Temblor” sandstone and Monterey shale. At the base of the Miocene section...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1998
AAPG Bulletin (1998) 82 (8): 1551-1574.
... interconnected voids for hydrocarbon transport. Petroleum-filled breccia zones are exposed in the Antelope Shale at Chico Martinez Creek on the northeastern flank of the Temblor Range near McKittrick, California. Breccia zones are found predominantly parallel to bedding in porcelanite units (4–10 cm thick...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 2001
AAPG Bulletin (2001) 85 (4): 561-585.
... revision and confirmation of prior assumptions regarding the nature of the Antelope shale reservoir. Conventional analyses focused on four specific rock types: (1) porcelanite (detritus-poor opal-CT), (2) porcelanite/siltstone (clay-bearing and silt-bearing opal-CT), (3) sandstone (clay poor), and (4...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1981
AAPG Bulletin (1981) 65 (3): 438-465.
... of electric log of Paloma deep test, illustrating contrast in character between shallow marine Pliocene sand and clays, left and center, and deep-water Stevens cherts, sands, and shales, right. Depths are in feet. Recognizing that the entire pre-upper Stevens section at Paloma is composed of turbidites...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1942
AAPG Bulletin (1942) 26 (10): 1647-1655.
... of the Uscari shale. The formation sampled is fine gray clay, or mud, shale distinctly bedded in fresh outcrops, but inclined to slump and become formless in older exposures. It rapidly weathers to tan or brown. It would appear that there is no Uscari shale as it is known from published faunal...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1925
AAPG Bulletin (1925) 9 (6): 990-999.
... clay shale, massive, dark in color and with light-colored lenses of harder, laminated material; definitely Cretaceous in age; called “Moreno” by Anderson and Pack but not certainly the same as their Moreno at the type locality Soft clay shale, massive in deposition, definitely Eocene in age...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1928
AAPG Bulletin (1928) 12 (10): 969-983.
... Bakersfield, generally referred to the Temblor formation, are different in their fossil content from those known at Monterey; they should properly be placed in a different formation. But it has been fairly definitely proved that the equivalent of the Temblor shales is not present in the lower part of the type...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1939
AAPG Bulletin (1939) 23 (1): 24-44.
... on the southwest by the more resistant “McLure shale” and the ridge-forming Temblor formation. On the northeast the cuesta topography of the Etchegoin sands looms prominently in contrast. Outcroppings of the Reef Ridge shale are generally poor and infrequent. These evidences can be taken to imply...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1933
AAPG Bulletin (1933) 17 (10): 1161-1193.
... clays are a mappable unit about 2,600 feet in thickness. There is some evidence of unconformity at the top of the formation below the basal reef of the Tulare formation. The Tulare rests on various beds of the San Joaquin clays, in places coming down onto the shale beds which generally occur 25 feet...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1934
AAPG Bulletin (1934) 18 (12): 1559-1576.
.... In Big Tar Canyon there is a 10–15 foot sandy shale at the top of this zone. This sand is here classed as basal Temblor, though it may possibly include sands of Vaqueros (lower Miocene) age or even older beds, as there is little paleontologic evidence on the age of this basal zone. With the small amount...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 2013
AAPG Bulletin (2013) 97 (1): 103-143.
... in the basin probably exist, but their occurrence is poorly documented in the open literature. For example, as discussed below, Carter (1985) describes characteristics of the Santos Shale Member and the Media Shale Member of the Temblor Formation at Chico Martinez Creek, which suggest that they could...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 August 2012
Environmental and Engineering Geoscience (2012) 18 (3): 217-260.
..., and calcareous schist. 1b.2. Carbonate marble; (1c) Malaguide Complex, dark shale, conglomerate; sandstone; dolostone; (1d) External Zone: 1d.1. Triassic red clay, siltstone, dark dolostone, dolerite bodies. 1d.2. Lower Liassic dolostone and limestone. 1d.3. Liassic to Upper Cretaceous marl, marly siltstone...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1981
AAPG Bulletin (1981) 65 (1): 5-25.
..., 1974 ; Rashid and Vilks, 1977 ). Organic matter is generally concentrated in finer grained sediments ( Hunt, 1972 ). Space —A minimal amount of space is required for bacteria to function, particularly in fine-grained sediments where the organic nutrients are concentrated. Typical shale pores have...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1934
AAPG Bulletin (1934) 18 (4): 476-499.
... alternation. One reef-forming sandstone and minor diatomaceous and siliceous shales occur in this section. The beds, especially the clays, are gypsiferous. Several clay beds in the upper part of the formation have furnished drilling mud for the development of the Kettleman Hills oil field. The formation...
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