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Sespe red beds

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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1947
AAPG Bulletin (1947) 31 (11): 1913–1935.
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1946
AAPG Bulletin (1946) 30 (12): 2089.
...Thomas L. Bailey ABSTRACT The name “Sespe formation” is applied to the non-marine red bed facies of a group of sedimentary rocks up to 7,500 feet thick. They range in age from upper Eocene into lower Miocene in the southern and eastern part of the Ventura basin but are probably confined...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1928
AAPG Bulletin (1928) 12 (1): 85–87.
.... Immediately north and west of the town of Ventura, on the California coast between Los Angeles and Santa Barbara, the Oligocene(?)-Miocene Sespe red beds outcrop extensively in the mountains, the nearest outcrop to the ocean being about two miles from it. Several streams, most of them intermittent streams...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1953
AAPG Bulletin (1953) 37 (12): 2776.
...Robert H. Paschall ABSTRACT The Sespe formation, composed of red, buff, and gray sandstone and conglomerate, and red and green siltstone, has a landward extent of about 1,250 square miles, and a volume of about 950 cubic miles. Its seaward extent may be greater or much less than that on land, since...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1982
AAPG Bulletin (1982) 66 (7): 805–829.
... and are seismogenic. The Rincon Creek fault dips 35 to 60° south, steepening to nearly vertical at depth, where it apparently passes into bedding within the Sespe Formation. The Rincon Creek fault offsets late Pleistocene marine terraces and is itself deformed by the Red Mountain fault. The Red Mountain fault dips 55...
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..., bedding characteristics and sedimentary structures ( Table 1 ). Facies A, B, C, and D are the most widespread and are generally present in sequential order as the Sespe Formation is stratigraphically ascended. Facies C makes up the bulk of the Sespe Formation throughout its area of extent, whereas facies...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1976
AAPG Bulletin (1976) 60 (1): 65–86.
... is similar ( Yeats et al, 1974 ), consisting of red, maroon, and gray sandstone and cobble conglomerate, with green and maroon siltstone and mudstone. In the eastern Santa Monica Mountains, the typical Sespered beds” are absent, and may be represented by several hundred feet of brown cobble conglomerate...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1936
AAPG Bulletin (1936) 20 (12): 1632–1643.
... or calcareous member, with similar fossils, in parts of both regions, is particularly striking. Oligocene .—In the longitude of Santa Barbara, red beds of typical Sespe type are conspicuous both north and south of the Santa Ynez Mountains. Farther north they are absent, and farther west they give way...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1929
AAPG Bulletin (1929) 13 (5): 489–507.
... in the Santa Ynez Mountains between San Marcos Pass, near Santa Barbara, and Sespe Canyon, in central Ventura County. Like the red beds of other regions, this formation has given rise to much speculation. It is generally considered to mark an arid stage in the climatic history of the Tertiary period (4, p. 752...
FIGURES
Image
—Schematic diagram for paired point-count results from oxidized <span class="search-highlight">red</span> (stippl...
Published: 01 September 1993
Figure 3 —Schematic diagram for paired point-count results from oxidized red (stippled) and reduced white (no pattern) areas from single thin sections. Analyses were made for three samples from the Sespe Formation, California, for three different depths from the same core. In each case, thin
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1947
AAPG Bulletin (1947) 31 (11): 1913–1935.
... the fine sandstones and argillaceous beds are still red. Two or three miles northwest of the Capitan oil field, marine fossils begin to appear in the buff-weathering sandstones near the base of the Sespe and finally, north of Santa Anita Station, which is about 10 miles east-northeast of Pt. Concepcion...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geosphere
Published: 15 October 2020
Geosphere (2020) 16 (6): 1425–1456.
.... 20 Ma) components of the Sespe Formation include a diverse population of white, black, red, and green pebbles and cobbles that include metaquartzite and silica-cemented orthoquartzite that range in composition from quartz arenite to arkose. Figure 1 shows potential source regions...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1924
AAPG Bulletin (1924) 8 (6): 789–829.
... .—In the region of South Mountain the Sespe series includes over 6,000 feet of sandstone, clayey sandstone, and shale. This great thickness of beds is a typical “red bed” series, and, from its lithologic character and the lack of remains of marine organisms, it is believed to be of non-marine origin...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1937
AAPG Bulletin (1937) 21 (2): 212–232.
... beds first appear, the latter rest on the schists with a depositional contact, and the fault here is between the Mint Canyon formation and the overlying older red beds of the supposed Sespe. The latter are highly fractured, and stained a deep maroon by hematite deposited by water moving along...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1925
AAPG Bulletin (1925) 9 (7): 1071–1088.
... and there visible along the northern edge of the range. The Sespe formation consists of a thick series of red, yellow, and white sandstones, red, maroon, gray, and green sandy shales, sticky red and maroon clays, and numerous lenses of conglomerate. The rapid lateral variation, the general character of the beds...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1928
AAPG Bulletin (1928) 12 (7): 747–752.
... of the river. According to Eldridge 4 the upper zone of the Sespe on the north side of the Lower Ojai valley consists of rusty sandstones and red to gray beds of sandstone with shale layers. These beds contain scattered pebbles. At South Mountain, 1 south of Santa Clara River and about 11 miles southeast...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1947
AAPG Bulletin (1947) 31 (8): 1505–1509.
... two large faults are apparent. A thin exposure of lower Miocene Rincon shale with Oligocene (?) Sespe 7 red sandstone overlying it, in an overturned attitude, is thrust over Modelo shale which, in turn, has overridden Pico beds. Oakridge fault ( Fig. 4 ).—A deep well in the Shiells Canyon...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1928
AAPG Bulletin (1928) 12 (7): 743–746.
...Philip W. Reinhart ABSTRACT Mechanical analyses of rock samples, field observation of features such as cross-bedding, and reports of other investigators lead the writer to the conclusion that the Sespe formation originated as an alluvial-fan deposit, under warm, semi-arid conditions. 1 Paper...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: Geosphere
Published: 16 October 2019
Geosphere (2019) 15 (6): 1973–1998.
... localities (black dots) with Sespe depositional ages, including: 1—View Lane Drive locality in Simi Valley; 2—Piuma Road and Scheuren Road localities in the Santa Monica Mountains; and 3—Red Rock Trail in Limestone Canyon Park and Santiago Canyon Road localities in the Santa Ana Mountains ( Tables 2 and 3...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1928
AAPG Bulletin (1928) 12 (3): 235–269.
... shale and buff to brown bedded limestone. The Modelo is locally very petroliferous, and associated with these petroliferous zones are outcrops of shale which has been fused to a red and black, in many places scoriaceous, rock, by the burning of the oil. The distinctive megascopic features...
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