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Our shrinking globe

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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1952
GSA Bulletin (1952) 63 (10): 1069–1072.
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1952
GSA Bulletin (1952) 63 (10): 1073–1074.
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1952
GSA Bulletin (1952) 63 (3): 225–240.
... compressional forces were expressed in folds and thrust faults, arcuate mountain systems and island arcs, and geanticlines and swells. Volcanoes were a possible by-product anywhere, but batholithic intrusions were confined to the sial-capped continents. Possible causes for a shrinking globe include downward...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1950
AAPG Bulletin (1950) 34 (3): 618–619.
... of a shrinking globe accounts for the great ocean basins by the withdrawal of the original granitic crust from these areas during the processes of orogenesis and crustal shortening in which successive belts of deposition and diastrophism were folded and thrust toward pre-existing shield areas which acted...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1947
AAPG Bulletin (1947) 31 (7): 1300–1303.
... masses and ocean basins are matters of large concern to students of the Earth, who will give attention to W. G. Woolnough’s recent excursion into this fascinating but speculative field. 3 Even though such discussions can lead to no positive conclusions, they stimulate us to re-examine our globes...
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 2016
Vadose Zone Journal (2016) 15 (3): vzj2015.11.0146.
... is the density of the solid particles. To allow easy comparison among different data sets and models, we have opted to present our model using both absolute and normalized terms. Naturally occurring shrink–swell (vertic) soils are characterized by crack networks that extend from the soil surface to a depth...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2018
Earth Sciences History (2018) 37 (1): 144–156.
... [koiné dialektos , or simply koiné], κοπή [kope], i.e. , to cut). Of the latter class of structures, the great mountain chains of our globe, the orogens of Kober (1921 , p. 21), i.e. , products of orogeny , are clearly the most impressive and, accordingly, have received the greatest attention...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1939
AAPG Bulletin (1939) 23 (9): 1320–1351.
... layer of tachylyte. The uppermost and intermediate layers are generally referred to as the crust. Below the isostatic layer the earth is cooling and shrinking. Stresses in the isostatic layer are piled up until the breaking point is reached when these stresses are relieved by deformation of the crust...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 May 2024
Earth Sciences History (2024) 43 (1): 13–26.
... of phenomena … we have to deal with the wide realm of conjectures, and perhaps there is no other field of knowledge in which hypotheses are so abundant like that of the globe’s structure, that is why one of the most distinguished naturalists of our age (Mr. Cuvier) has claimed … that nobody can pronounce...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 December 2022
Elements (2022) 18 (6): 365–367.
...). This issue features passages written by Professor Rodney C. Ewing (Stanford University, USA), Professor Emeritus Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University, USA), and Robert M. Hazen (Carnegie Institution for Science, USA). As our earliest, distant ancestors evolved and spread across...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 April 1983
Earth Sciences History (1983) 2 (1): 11–16.
...Ellen T. Drake; Paul D. Komar ABSTRACT Among his 17th century contemporaries Robert Hooke (1635-1703) was exceptional in his investigations of the terraqueous globe by experimentation and development of instrumentation for ocean exploration and in forming hypotheses concerning the origin...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 2012
AAPG Bulletin (2012) 96 (5): 773–788.
... almost the same. After stopping the initial oil injection, the sectional area of the migration pathway shrinks significantly. Therefore, we believe that this significant shrinking of the migration pathway is the main reason why only a relatively small volume of oil and gas has been lost during secondary...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2019
Earth Sciences History (2019) 38 (2): 204–214.
... of the ground or lose themselves in the clouds, their influence will ultimately be the same. They must soon come to unite with the general mass of the globe; for, beyond the boundaries of our atmosphere, there are no gaseous fluids to disperse the circulating heat indefinitely into space. ( Leslie 1804 , pp...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: The Leading Edge
Published: 01 August 2017
The Leading Edge (2017) 36 (8): 634–639.
... at Halliburton, will be the featured luncheon speaker and will deliver a presentation titled, “Demystifying E&P big data: Challenges, opportunities, and the path forward.” SEG President Bill Abriel, who has traveled the globe extensively during his tenure, also will briefly share insights from his experience...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1970
AAPG Bulletin (1970) 54 (11): 1980–1983.
... views of the earth from the Apollo missions, especially those showing the stark, barren moonscape in the foreground—contrasted with our blue, white, and brown globe shining like an oasis in the blackness of outer space—have brought home to all of us the special, unique kind of Garden of Eden we live...
Journal Article
Journal: The Leading Edge
Published: 01 October 2001
The Leading Edge (2001) 20 (10): 1120–1122.
... workshop planners (the authors and Yaoguo Li, GMRC director) considered linking the CSM wavelet workshop to one following the 2001 ASEG convention in Brisbane, Australia. Some obvious and daunting questions immediately arose. Could we link people across the globe? What about time zones? What technology...
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2010
Earth Sciences History (2010) 29 (2): 311–330.
... was that of an incandescent globe, which then started to cool, forming a thin, solid crust without much topography. Mountains and basins only formed later, when the Earth started to shrink as a result of further cooling. Therefore, there must have been a time when the sea had no coast and covered the whole globe. At an even...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2013
Earth Sciences History (2013) 32 (2): 235–251.
... “observations, that the temperature of our globe is related to two poles of maximum cold distant from the poles of rotation, and related in position to the magnetic poles” ( Anonymous 1832 , pp. 155–156). Similarly the Scottish physicist James Forbes (1809–1868) adopted the cold pole theory in his “Report upon...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: The Leading Edge
Published: 01 January 2016
The Leading Edge (2016) 35 (1): 64–70.
... of external magnetic-field variations that induce electrical currents in the subsurface. Sources of such magnetic-field variations are frequency dependent. At frequencies greater than 1 Hz, the sources are high-amplitude lightning strikes around the globe that occur mainly at equatorial latitudes...
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Journal Article
Published: 22 December 2021
Seismological Research Letters (2022) 93 (2A): 880–896.
... bias toward unclipped records in the development dataset, this aligns with our model preference of avoiding false flagging of clean data and shrinking our pool of working records; we anticipate little overall impact on the effectiveness of our algorithms. We retrieved raw records from...
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