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Microforaminifera

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Journal Article
Published: 01 December 2001
Journal of Micropalaeontology (2001) 20 (2): 179-182.
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: Palynology
Published: 01 October 1995
Palynology (1995) 19 (1): 77-84.
...Scott W. Mathison; Gail L. Chmura Abstract In this study we examine the nature of microforaminifera test linings found in palynological preparations and demonstrate the potential of these palynomorphs for paleoenvironmental interpretation. Sediment samples from four marsh salinity zones...
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1968
Micropaleontology (1968) 14 (3): 361-362.
...Arthur D. Cohen; Albert L. Guber Abstract Pollen-sized 'microforaminifera' were produced from 'normal-sized' calcareous foraminifera of the species Ammonia limnetes (Todd and Bronnimann) by the differential destruction of the test with 5 percent HC1. GeoRef, Copyright 2004, American Geological...
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1960
Micropaleontology (1960) 6 (4): 399-415.
... of the microforaminifera to the other Foraminifera present in each sample. Measurements made on series of Foraminifera ranging in size from 60 to 800 microns indicate the lack of a natural size boundary for the microforaminifera group. Identifications of microforaminifera, where possible, were based on comparisons...
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1958
Micropaleontology (1958) 4 (4): 429-430.
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1957
Micropaleontology (1957) 3 (1): 61-64.
...Otto Wetzel Abstract "The natural resistance of many minute structures in samples of various sediments is very great. 'Microforaminifera' are recognizable even after natural decalcification, when they possess membranous linings or when their chamber walls have been replaced with resistant mineral...
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1957
Micropaleontology (1957) 3 (1): 74.
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1957
AAPG Bulletin (1957) 41 (8): 1683-1693.
... was used successfully on samples from two sections of the Mancos group from the Book Cliffs, Utah. Four groups of microfossils were extracted by treating the samples with phosphoric and hydrofluoric acids. These are: pollen and spores, hystrichospherids, dinoflagellates, and microforaminifera. Pollen...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 May 2000
Journal of Micropalaeontology (2000) 19 (1): 61-67.
... of microforaminifera formally described here is assigned to Aubignyna and shown to occur in a wide range of intertidal–shallow subtidal, brackish–normal marine estuaries and lagoons in Europe and North America. The new species has most of the attributes of the genus Aubignyna although it is considerably smaller...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1994
GSA Bulletin (1994) 106 (5): 705-714.
... the lowest abundances of extraregional pollen. A general palynological model can be constructed to distinguish subenvironments of the delta plain using four attributes: presence of microforaminifera, abundance of reworked pollen, palynomorph concentration, and the ratio of regional to local pollen types...
Series: SEPM Special Publication
Published: 01 January 1964
DOI: 10.2110/pec.64.01.0116
EISBN: 9781565761414
... hystrichosphaerids, dinoflagellates and microforaminifera, 44 “main species” were selected because they were peculiarly abundant. The frequency variations of these 44 species allowed us to make four easily distinguished, major stratigraphie units, and subdivide them into a dozen zones, quite independent...
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1964
Micropaleontology (1964) 10 (1): 80.
...Dorothy Jung Echols; Harold L. Levin Abstract Dust from blackboard chalk may contaminate samples with its coccoliths, diatoms, and microforaminifera.--Author's abstrac GeoRef, Copyright 2004, American Geological Institute. Reference includes data from Bibliography and Index of North American...
Image
—Microfossils in bottom sediments.   Figs. 1–3. Pollen and spores: (1a, b) ...
Published: 01 March 1959
Pl. 1. —Microfossils in bottom sediments. Figs. 1–3. Pollen and spores: (1a, b) Palmae, cf. Nipa; (2) cf. Palmae; (3) trilete spore. Figs. 4–6. Microforaminifera, decalcified trochoid forms. Figs. 7–14. Dinoflagellata: (7–8) Dinoflagellata, order Dinideridea; (7) cf. Hystrichosphaera
Journal Article
Journal: PALAIOS
Published: 01 October 2009
PALAIOS (2009) 24 (10): 650-656.
... due to low pollen concentrations. Pollen grains were identified using previously published procedures ( Wooller et al., 2004 , 2007 ). Pollen data are reported as percentages of the total pollen sum, which excludes aquatic taxa, fern and fungal spores, and microforaminifera. Pollen diagrams were...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1962
AAPG Bulletin (1962) 46 (5): 694-699.
..., dinoflagellates and hystrichosphaerids, and microforaminifera as a three-end-member system for biofacies mapping. Ostracodes have been tried in a test case and found useful and there seems to be no reason to think that the method can not be applied to many groups of micro- and megafossils. The most...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2007
European Journal of Mineralogy (2007) 19 (1): 137-144.
... have a high CaO content (9.58–13.83 wt%), so that they can be classified as clay marls. The grain size of the non plastic inclusions in Cav 29 is slightly larger than that of Cav 37 ( Fig. 2f, 2g ); in both it is possible to observe quartz fragments, white micas and planktonic microforaminifera...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1962
AAPG Bulletin (1962) 46 (12): 2133-2147.
... the base sum those marine and possible marine forms, such as inaperturates of unknown origin, dinoflagellates, hystrichosphaerids, and microforaminifera, whose distribution may be controlled by marine environments. The need for such an approach is illustrated by the inverse abundance relationship between...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1959
AAPG Bulletin (1959) 43 (3): 501-562.
...Pl. 1. —Microfossils in bottom sediments. Figs. 1–3. Pollen and spores: (1a, b) Palmae, cf. Nipa; (2) cf. Palmae; (3) trilete spore. Figs. 4–6. Microforaminifera, decalcified trochoid forms. Figs. 7–14. Dinoflagellata: (7–8) Dinoflagellata, order Dinideridea; (7) cf. Hystrichosphaera...
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Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2010
DOI: 10.1144/SP340.11
EISBN: 9781862395886
... these rocks pass into coarse-grained sandstones and there appear layers of gritstones. In some localities, the sandstones contain a lot of marine-mollusc fossils that confidently evidence the age of the enclosing rocks. In some places, the carbonate rocks yield an abundance of microforaminifera ( Gamkrelidze...
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Series: The Micropalaeontological Society, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2005
DOI: 10.1144/TMS001.8
EISBN: 9781862396197
... in the Georgievka Formation). Macrobenthos is represented by remains of bivalves and gastropods. Silty environments were inhabited by rare microbenthic forms (foraminifera and microforaminifera) comprising Trochammina, Lenticulina, Kutsevella and Microkutsevella . Kimmeridgian microphytoplankton associations...
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