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Maxville Limestone

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Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1995
Journal of Paleontology (1995) 69 (4): 617–624.
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1993
Journal of Paleontology (1993) 67 (4): 571–585.
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1950
AAPG Bulletin (1950) 34 (5): 882–922.
... exceeds the northern limit of the Hillsdale by 23 miles and may be seen as far north as southern Randolph County. Westward under the basin it is thought to be the equivalent of the Maxville limestone of Ohio. Stratigraphic and faunal evidence shows the relationship of the Hillsdale with the St. Louis...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2005
Journal of Paleontology (2005) 79 (5): 1019–1020.
.... These reports concerned pre-Chesterian occurrences with the exception of the Chesterian Bransonia hydei Hoare, 1990 and Oxyprora sp. Hoare (2004) from the Maxville Limestone. Specimens of the new taxon were reported by Busanus (1974) as Conocardium spp. from the Chesterian Reynolds Limestone...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1927
AAPG Bulletin (1927) 11 (10): 1023–1033.
.... “The Big lime” of the shallow fields is the Maxville limestone, which is the highest member of the Mississippian. It consists of thin-bedded limestones interbedded with sandy layers in which the production occurs. Although its thickness is in places as great as 100 feet, it is very lenticular...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1950
AAPG Bulletin (1950) 34 (9): 1874–1886.
..., is the Mississippian Maxville limestone. Underlying the Maxville limestone is the Waverly group of Ohio and Kentucky, consisting of the Black Hand formation at the top, succeeded in depth by the Cuyahoga shale, the Berea sandstone, and Bedford shale. This group is underlaid by the thickening sequence of Ohio shales...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1949
AAPG Bulletin (1949) 33 (10): 1704–1730.
... equivalents in adjacent parts of Pennsylvania and Ohio. Because the unit is essentially a continuous lithologic unit in the subsurface in the area discussed it is for convenience referred to as the Greenbrier formation throughout the paper. This use of the term does not imply that the name Maxville limestone...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1927
AAPG Bulletin (1927) 11 (9): 945–958.
... in the sandstones between the Sharon coal and the Maxville limestone. Fig. 7 The attitude of the Pomeroy (8 a ) coal in Chester, Olive, Sutton, and Lebanon townships is shown in Figure 5 . The Pomeroy coal, lying 30 feet higher than the Pittsburgh coal (the latter is absent throughout the area...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1938
AAPG Bulletin (1938) 22 (11): 1519–1559.
.... The upper, very persistent member of the Meramec group is the St. Genevieve limestone which is the Ohara or Fredonia limestone in the eastern basin of Kentucky and Tennessee, the Maxville limestone in Ohio, and the Bayport limestone in Michigan. The St. Genevieve is light gray, slightly oolitic, finely...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1964
AAPG Bulletin (1964) 48 (4): 465–486.
... with the Maxville limestone of eastern Ohio and the Loyalhanna limestone of southwestern Pennsylvania. In Ohio, the Maxville limestone thins toward the west and crops out in a narrow belt trending north and south in eastern Ohio. The Loyalhanna limestone thins markedly toward the north and covers only a small part...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1970
AAPG Bulletin (1970) 54 (5): 758–782.
... in Marion County, West Virginia, in 1889 (White, 1904, p. 58). The lower 7 ft is massive, fossiliferous, dolomitic limestone or calcitic dolostone. It is light olive gray, mottled dark gray by dolomite cement. There are no shale stringers to suggest bedding. It could be called a foraminiferal limestone...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1941
AAPG Bulletin (1941) 25 (5): 781–825.
... important deep wells are indicated. This section is constructed with the top of the Mississippian limestone (Greenbrier-Maxville) assumed as being horizontal. The top of the Mississippian limestone is in places difficult to recognize because of the presence of as many as five thin shales. Usually...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1961
AAPG Bulletin (1961) 45 (4): 471–483.
... the Appalachian to the Cordilleran Mountains and from the Great Lakes to the Gulf Coastal Plain, their formal application may be warranted only within a smaller area. The Mammoth Cave Limestone Megagroup is represented in Michigan by only the Bayport (Point Au Gres) Limestone and in Ohio by only the Maxville...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1927
AAPG Bulletin (1927) 11 (7): 705–719.
... was laid down in the Appalachian geosyncline with successive overlaps to the west, until, at its widest extent, it reached nearly to Ohio River. Conformably below the Mauch Chunk is the Greenbrier limestone, the “Big Lime” of the driller, which is equivalent to the Maxville of Ohio. The Greenbrier...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1961
AAPG Bulletin (1961) 45 (8): 1301–1309.
... zero to more than 150 feet in thickness. The lithologic character of the formation is varied but a basal limestone or dolomite conglomerate characterizes most occurrences. In southern Montana and northern Wyoming, the Beartooth Butte crops out as discontinuous estuarine and fluviatile channel-fill...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 June 1927
AAPG Bulletin (1927) 11 (6): 581–599.
... that this remnant of a series that is 1,800 feet thick in southern West Virginia and even thicker in southwestern Virginia is mainly, if not entirely, the Union limestone member, which in turn is a most probable equivalent of the Maxville of Ohio and of the combined Gasper and Fredonia of more western states...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 June 2012
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2012) 102 (3): 980–990.
... (dominantly shales and some sandstones), Mississippian rocks (mostly limestones with some shale), or older Paleozoic limestones, which dip gently toward the east ( Harrison, 1997 ). Information gleaned from the engineering borings in this region indicate that the Quaternary deposits are generally about 30...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 May 2008
Journal of Paleontology (2008) 82 (3): 511–527.
... Walter , 1924 , p. 324–327, pl. 27, figs. 9, 10. Kaskia genevievensis Brezinski , 2003 , p. 370. Pella beds of Iowa, lower Chesterian of Indiana, Maxville Limestone of Ohio, Wymps Gap Limestone of the Mauch Chunk Formation of Pennsylvania, and the Greenbrier Limestone of Maryland and West...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 June 1974
AAPG Bulletin (1974) 58 (6): 934–956.
... control and with classic paleontology. In the outcrop area the four Niagaran reef-bearing formations (in order of decreasing age: the Salamonie Dolomite, Waldron Formation, Louisville Limestone, and Wabash Formation) consist dominantly of dolomltized carbonate sediments that represent interreef...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1956
AAPG Bulletin (1956) 40 (12): 2826–2863.
... and the phosphatic shale, that is the apparent correlative of the upper part of the Wells formation and the lower member of the Park City formation. The limestone, chert, and sandstone between the Oquirrh formation (of Pennsylvanian and Permian age) and the Triassic rocks in northwestern Utah were named...
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