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Martian crust

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A model illustrating the variation in  f  O 2   for the <b>martian</b> <b>crust</b> and m...
Published: 01 October 2006
F igure 6. A model illustrating the variation in f O 2 for the martian crust and martian upper mantle. Also illustrated is the petrogenesis of the various shergottites within the context of this model. The olivine-phyric shergottites (particularly Y98) approach near-primary melt
Image
( A ) Major subdivisions of <b>Martian</b> <b>crust</b> illustrated by using MGS MOC and ...
in > Elements
Published: 01 June 2006
FIGURE 1 ( A ) Major subdivisions of Martian crust illustrated by using MGS MOC and MOLA datasets. VBF—Vastitas Borealis Formation ( Tanaka et al. 2003 ). ( B ) Distribution of near-surface H 2 O ice and ice-rich mantles. MOC-MOLA context image with GRS near-surface ice (blue) (e.g. Boynton et
Image
( A ) Major subdivisions of <b>Martian</b> <b>crust</b> illustrated by using MGS MOC and ...
in > Elements
Published: 01 June 2006
FIGURE 1 ( A ) Major subdivisions of Martian crust illustrated by using MGS MOC and MOLA datasets. VBF—Vastitas Borealis Formation ( Tanaka et al. 2003 ). ( B ) Distribution of near-surface H 2 O ice and ice-rich mantles. MOC-MOLA context image with GRS near-surface ice (blue) (e.g. Boynton et
Image
Figure 1. A: Major subdivisions of <b>Martian</b> <b>crust</b> illustrated by using Mars ...
in > Geology
Published: 01 August 2004
Figure 1. A: Major subdivisions of Martian crust illustrated by using Mars Global Surveyor (MGS), Mars Orbiter camera (MOC) and Mars Orbiter laser altimeter (MOLA) data sets. VBF—Vastitas Borealis Formation. B: Thermal emission spectrometer image of distribution of surface type: ST1 (green) and ST2
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2014
American Mineralogist (2014) 99 (4): 601-606.
... and textural analysis, we suggest that NWA 6963 is an intrusive rock similar to a terrestrial gabbro. Infiltration of the martian crust by young gabbroic bodies would suggest that estimates of crustal composition, density, and thickness based on the surface chemistry alone would be problematic and the martian...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2006
American Mineralogist (2006) 91 (10): 1657-1663.
...F igure 6. A model illustrating the variation in f O 2 for the martian crust and martian upper mantle. Also illustrated is the petrogenesis of the various shergottites within the context of this model. The olivine-phyric shergottites (particularly Y98) approach near-primary melt...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 May 2000
Geology (2000) 28 (5): 391-394.
... an upper bound on the cooling time available of 10 2 –10 5 yr. These bounds can be satisfied if the magnetic anomalies are created by successive intrusion of dikes from 20 to 2000 m wide. Production of a Martian crust 35–60 km thick by rifting requires either mantle potential temperatures in excess of 1430...
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Series: SEPM Special Publication
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.2110/pec.12.102.0119
EISBN: 9781565763135
... of chemical divides can be constructed and indicates that the range of observed evaporite minerals can be explained by typical water compositions derived from acidic weathering of Martian crust, and with variable initial pH controlled by HCO − 3 /SO 2− 4 ratios. Several diagenetic processes have also been...
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Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 April 2009
DOI: 10.1130/2009.453(02)
... stability of the Martian crust and lower degradation rates. Impact cratering had its greatest effect early in Solar System history when bombardment rates were higher than today and the sizes of the impacting objects were larger. The record from this period of time is largely lost on Earth. High bombardment...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1977
GSA Bulletin (1977) 88 (7): 908-919.
... in Elysium than in Tharsis and that the source of the Elysium volcanics has been chemically evolved, with evidence of silicic magma. Finally, the data are consistent with the view that the martian crust has been stable and essentially motionless for an extended period of martian geologic time. Geological...
Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 August 2010
DOI: 10.1130/2010.2470(08)
... the Martian crust. The maximum viscosity at the bottom of the Martian lithosphere, derived from our spreading analysis, is in the order of 10 21 Pa s, so if the mantle of Mars is hot and ductile, we suggest that the spreading of Tharsis could still be occurring. ...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1973
AAPG Bulletin (1973) 57 (9): 1843.
...Harold Masursky Abstract The year-long observations of Mars by Mariner 9, combined with earlier spacecraft and ground-based data, have demonstrated a complex evolution for the Martian crust and a complex interaction between crustal and surficial processes that is still in progress. Volcanic...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 November 2008
Geology (2008) 36 (11): 847-850.
... be a common weathering product of the basaltic Martian crust. These materials are associated with hydrated Fe sulfates, including H 3 O-bearing jarosite, and are found in finely stratified deposits exposed on the floor of and on the plains surrounding the Valles Marineris canyon system. Stratigraphic...
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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 July 2008
Geology (2008) 36 (7): 579-582.
... the lack of local detectable alteration products, these trends may be an indication that most Martian dark regions are not similar in composition to the primary igneous composition from which they are derived. The Martian crust may be significantly more mafic, and alteration of these surfaces may be more...
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Journal Article
Published: 14 November 2018
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (2018) 56 (9): 917-931.
...Jafar Arkani-Hamed The core dynamos of Mars and the Moon have distinctly different histories. Mars had no core dynamo at the end of accretion. It took ∼100 Myr for the core to create a strong dynamo that magnetized the martian crust. Giant impacts during 4.2–4.0 Ga crippled the core dynamo...
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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1973
GSA Bulletin (1973) 84 (3): 741-748.
... apparently indicates a local tectonic extension of the Martian crust as the mechanism for producing the chaotic terrain. Geological Society of America 1973 ...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 February 2016
Geology (2016) 44 (2): 107-110.
... the typical style of deformation above the shallow tips of widening dikes on Mars. The dikes are embedded in a frictional, cohesive material representing the Martian crust. In the experiments presented here, subsidence and extensional faulting (graben formation) are produced above the dike tips, even...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2012
American Mineralogist (2012) 97 (11-12): 1841-1848.
... complex, which accounts for 50% of martian igneous activity since stabilization of the primordial crust. If oxygen fugacity in the sources of hot Tharsis magmatism were equivalent to that at the iron-wüstite buffer (IW) or 1 log unit above (IW+1), respectively, then the entire Tharsis event would outgas...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: Elements
Published: 01 June 2006
Elements (2006) 2 (3): 157-162.
... of alteration fluid ( Vicenzi and Heaney 2000 ). Efforts to determine precisely the age of the secondary minerals, and hence the timing of fluid flow in the Martian crust, are hampered by the chemical complexity of the minerals. Despite this complication, age estimates for the precipitation of iddingsite...
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Series: SEPM Special Publication
Published: 01 January 2012
DOI: 10.2110/pec.12.102.0097
EISBN: 9781565763135
... ABSTRACT Many of the minerals observed or inferred to occur in the sediments and sedimentary rocks of Mars, from a variety of Mars-mission spacecraft data, also occur in Martian meteorites. Even Martian meteorites recovered after some exposure to terrestrial weathering can preserve...
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