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Loyalhanna Limestone Member

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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1985
AAPG Bulletin (1985) 69 (9): 1434.
...Carney Cindy; Richard Smosna Abstract: The Loyalhanna is a sparsely fossiliferous, distinctively cross-bedded, sandy calcarenite and calcareous sandstone. It occurs along the outcrop belt and in the subsurface of Pennsylvania and West Virginia where it is less than 100 ft (30 m) thick. In West...
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2008
Journal of Paleontology (2008) 82 (6): 1182–1189.
... into the Loyalhanna Member, a middle unnamed clastic member, and the Wymps Gap Member ( Figs. 2 and 3 ) ( Kammer and Lake, 2001 ). The Loyalhanna Member contains brachiopods indicating age equivalence with the Ste. Genevieve Limestone of the Illinois Basin ( Carter and Carter, 1970 ; Brezinski, 1989 ). The Wymps...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1964
AAPG Bulletin (1964) 48 (4): 465–486.
... are elongate in a direction parallel with the ancient shoreline which is, in turn, parallel with the isopach contours drawn on the total thickness of the Greenbrier limestone. The uppermost members of the Greenbrier limestone are time-equivalent and apparently were deposited contemporaneously over an extensive...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1949
AAPG Bulletin (1949) 33 (10): 1704–1730.
... of Ohio, or that the name Loyalhanna limestone which is used for the partial equivalent of the Greenbrier in Pennsylvania is being replaced. Drillers refer to the subsurface Greenbrier and equivalents as the “Big lime.” Most of the data were obtained from examination and study of (1) drill cuttings...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 February 2019
Environmental and Engineering Geoscience (2019) 25 (1): 27–101.
.... This formation consists of numerous relatively persistent limestone seams and lesser claystone beds in the upper portion, with the lower portion predominately composed of shale, sandstone, and coal seams. The lower member includes the approximate 10 ft (3 m) thick and persistent Pittsburgh Coal, overlain...
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Image
Figure  2 —Cross section showing stratigraphic correlations of the Greenbri...
Published: 01 November 2008
Figure 2 —Cross section showing stratigraphic correlations of the Greenbrier Limestone from North to South in southern Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Locality numbers keyed to map in Figure 1 . The Greenbrier Limestone is thinner in the north and is a formation divided into members (WG = Wymps
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1943
AAPG Bulletin (1943) 27 (11): 1539–1542.
... to be correlated with the Glenray 6 limestone of southern West Virginia. A soft gray and green shale between the “Little lime” and the top of the Greenbrier is also of wide extent and is known by drillers as the “Pencil Cave.” It corresponds with the Lillydale shale of outcrop sections. The members of the Mauch...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1968
AAPG Bulletin (1968) 52 (2): 246–263.
... of western Pennsylvania, western Maryland, and West Virginia. It is composed mainly of red shale and sandstone, and several limestone members in the lower part of the formation in the Broad Top and Plateau areas. A preliminary study of the Mauch Chunk in the Broad Top region and elsewhere in western...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1941
AAPG Bulletin (1941) 25 (5): 781–825.
... members disappear. Near Irvine, Kentucky, on its western outcrop, the entire section has thinned to less than 25 feet and is identified as the Boyles limestone (Hamilton-Onondaga). Several miles east of the outcrop this limestone is absent, 26 with the overlying Brown shale resting unconformably upon...
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Series: SEPM Special Publication, SEPM Special Publication
Published: 01 January 2001
DOI: 10.2110/pec.01.71.0167
EISBN: 9781565761933
... and Pickaway Formations of the eastern Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Upper Mississippian carbonate eolianites were first described by Butts (1926) and Hickok and Moyer (1940) in their study of the Loyalhanna Limestone in the northern Appalachian Basin. The same quartz-peloid grainstones...
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Series: GSA Field Guide
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.1130/2011.0020(06)
EISBN: 9780813756202
.... These were probably Pottsville Formation sandstone blocks—the Pottsville crops out on the hillside where the river cuts through the Ebensburg anticline (Fig. 22 ), and appears to have been quarried near the viaduct. The backing stone for the bridge was cut from Loyalhanna Formation sandy limestone, which...
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Series: GSA Field Guide
Published: 01 January 2011
DOI: 10.1130/2011.0020(06)
EISBN: 9780813756202
... Formation or, perhaps, the Burgoon Sandstone. Swartz (1965) , Inners (1987) and Faill et al. (1989) all described plant remains in this portion of the section. Section No. 4 also contained a quartzose limestone bed ~9 m thick (Loyalhanna Formation at f in Fig. 12 ). The first true coal appeared...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1970
AAPG Bulletin (1970) 54 (5): 758–782.
... of the formation ( Fig. 3 ). The “Big Injun” as defined in this study is confined to the lower 60 ft or less of the Greenbrier Formation. No attempt is made to identify the members of the Greenbrier, but it seems probable that the “Big Injun” is the Loyalhanna Limestone described by Flowers (1956, p. 9...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1949
AAPG Bulletin (1949) 33 (10): 1682–1703.
.... The thickness of the Pocono group in the Conemaugh Gorge section is exceptional. No evidence of faulting could be found and, as the section is nearly completely exposed, this thickness is assumed to be correct. Structure mapping on the Loyalhanna limestone further verifies this interval. Cross section CC...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1963
AAPG Bulletin (1963) 47 (8): 1497–1526.
... limestones representing the youngest recorded episode in its depositional history. The “wedge-edge” of the Taconian hiatus extends westerly to an undetermined “meridian” in the Midwest. Thus the succession which is correlative with the Tippecanoe in the eastern Midwest and East comprises two sequences...
FIGURES
Series: GSA Field Guide
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.1130/2017.0046(01)
EISBN: 9780813756462
... Limestone Member comprises the uppermost unit of the Glenshaw Formation. During his trip, Lyell collected a marine fauna (brachiopods, snails, crinoids, and coral) from the Ames and associated beds close to river level ( Lyell, 1845 , p. 27-28). Casselman Formation shales, sandstones, limestones, coals...
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Series: GSA Field Guide
Published: 01 January 2017
DOI: 10.1130/2017.0046(03)
EISBN: 9780813756462
... Formation ( Harper, 2011 ) as the Pottsville crops out near this location. The Ebensburg anticline cuts through the meander bend and is just northwest of the viaduct location. Backing stone for the viaduct was sandy limestone from the Loyalhanna Formation, which also crops out nearby ( Harper, 2011...
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