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Glacier crevasses

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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1991
GSA Bulletin (1991) 103 (8): 1104–1108.
...ROGER LEB. HOOKE Abstract The principal points of water input to a glacier are the bergschrund in cirques, and crevasse fields lower on the glacier. Crevasse fields commonly occur over convexities at the heads of overdeepenings in glacier beds. The amplitude of subglacial water-pressure...
Image
Location of John Evans <b>Glacier</b> (Inset) and of the <b>crevasses</b>&#x2F;moulins (open c...
Published: 01 October 2017
Figure 6.2 Location of John Evans Glacier (Inset) and of the crevasses/moulins (open circles) where surface streams drained into the glacier after an initial period of surface ponding, and the artesian fountain (asterisk) and subglacial outflow where they emerged near the glacier terminus (from
Image
Photographs of features along the Denali and Totschunda fault rupture, wher...
Published: 01 December 2004
in November 2002 of complex fault rupture in the Gakona Glacier at about km 133. Note numerous Riedel shears that are nearly perpendicular to snow-filled crevasses. It was not possible to find features to measure across fault traces like this in November 2002. (C) Aerial view of offset crevasses
Image
Photographs of features along the Denali and Totschunda fault rupture, wher...
Published: 01 December 2004
in November 2002 of complex fault rupture in the Gakona Glacier at about km 133. Note numerous Riedel shears that are nearly perpendicular to snow-filled crevasses. It was not possible to find features to measure across fault traces like this in November 2002. (C) Aerial view of offset crevasses
Image
Sequence of  (a)  initial ponding of supraglacial meltwater above a <b>crevass</b>...
Published: 01 October 2017
Figure 6.4 Sequence of (a) initial ponding of supraglacial meltwater above a crevasse on John Evans Glacier (16 June), (b) supraglacial lake formation in the crevassed area (28 June), and (c) lake drainage by crevasse hydro-fracture (30 June). Fresh crevasses formed during the period
Image
(A) Idealized cross section of <b>crevassed</b> icefall zone and down-<b>glacier</b> topo...
Published: 01 October 2012
Figure 14. (A) Idealized cross section of crevassed icefall zone and down-glacier topography and radar scattering. “Summer” represents ice that has moved through the icefall zone during summer; “winter” represents ice that has moved through the icefall zone during winter. (B) The “summer
Image
Drumlins from  Figure 1  superimposed on 1995 air photo, showing that most ...
Published: 01 October 2010
Figure 5. Drumlins from Figure 1 superimposed on 1995 air photo, showing that most drumlins are located below deep longitudinal crevasses or crevasse swarms near glacier margin.
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 2001
Journal of the Geological Society (2001) 158 (4): 697–707.
... mapping on the glacier surface and analysis of sediments in the proglacial area of Midtre Lovénbreen indicate that the dynamic regime and thermal structure of the glacier have changed through time. Dynamically, Midtre Lovénbreen was once heavily crevassed and relatively fast moving, but now is virtually...
FIGURES | View All (13)
Journal Article
Published: 03 February 2021
Seismological Research Letters (2021) 92 (2A): 1185–1201.
... demonstrates that high‐frequency ( > 1 Hz ) seismic waves provide key constraints on a wide range of glacier processes, such as basal friction, surface crevassing, or subglacial water flow. Establishing quantitative links between the seismic signal and the processes of interest, however, requires detailed...
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Image
Changes of Flat Creek <b>glacier</b> (Alaska) and alluvial fan (orange and purple ...
Published: 27 April 2020
with permission. (C) Crevasse-free tongue of Flat Creek glacier and thicker, crevassed ice upstream. Ikonos image from 13 July 2009. The shadow used to estimate bulge height is indicated with the white arrow. Yellow and magenta lines are the edge of the bulge in 2009 and 2013, respectively. © Maxar 2020; image
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1976
GSA Bulletin (1976) 87 (11): 1629–1637.
...M. J. HAMBREY Abstract Sedimentary stratification, foliation, and crevasse traces (including those of healed crevasses) are well displayed at the surface of the small, steep glacier Charles Rabots Bre. Two main flow units, cropping out as convex downglacier arcuate systems of stratification...
Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.1144/GSL.SP.2000.176.01.10
EISBN: 9781862394247
... ellipses are computed and illustrated in plan-form and long section. The model is used to predict the formation and orientation of surface crevasses, and, once healed, the downglacier evolution of their traces. Similarly, the evolution of primary stratification where it crops out at the glacier surface...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 May 2011
Journal of the Geological Society (2011) 168 (3): 673–688.
..., decreased precipitation (resulting from a negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation) and increased fracturing of the glacier tongue. The enlargement of a proglacial lake played a key role in Brikdalsbreen's rapid retreat, allowing calving events and promoting crevassing and fluctuating water contents...
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