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Frenkel defects

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Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 January 1989
Geology (1989) 17 (1): 55–58.
...A. L. Odom; W. J. Rink Abstract Electron spin resonance (ESR) analyses have been made of natural quartz samples ranging in age from 100 ka to 1.4 Ga. Signal intensities of two ESR centers that can be associated with Schottky-Frenkel (SF) defects are significantly correlated with age. These defects...
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Structures of the most frequently encountered <span class="search-highlight">Frenkel</span> <span class="search-highlight">defects</span>, obtained at ...
Published: 01 April 2016
Figure 3 Structures of the most frequently encountered Frenkel defects, obtained at the end of the simulations after the displacement of: (a) Mg atoms, (b) Al or Si atoms, and (c) O atoms with kinetic energies above the TDE value. A star (*) symbol has been added to the label of each atom
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2017
American Mineralogist (2017) 102 (11): 2220–2229.
... 700–800 K for Na and K silicates, and above 900–1000 K for Li metasilicate. With strong thermal agitation, alkali-non-bridging oxygen (NBO) bonds are ruptured with the cations exiting their structural sites to occupy interstitial sites, thereby producing intrinsic Frenkel defects, which contribute...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 June 1985
American Mineralogist (1985) 70 (5-6): 608–618.
... energy for creation of split-nitrogen-interstitial/vacancy pairs (essentially a modified Frenkel defect), responsible for the conversion of A-centers into {100} platelet defects plus B-centers (nitrogen-charge-compensated vacancies) and (3) an activation energy for production of split-carbon self...
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2016
Clays and Clay Minerals (2016) 64 (2): 108–114.
...Figure 3 Structures of the most frequently encountered Frenkel defects, obtained at the end of the simulations after the displacement of: (a) Mg atoms, (b) Al or Si atoms, and (c) O atoms with kinetic energies above the TDE value. A star (*) symbol has been added to the label of each atom...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2013
American Mineralogist (2013) 98 (10): 1779–1787.
... in the plagioclase after 800–1000 °C are similar to interpolated diffusion rates for sodium diffusion in An 30 feldspar, implying that Na + and H + both diffuse via Frenkel defects involving the large cation sites and interstitial ions. The diffusion coefficient ( D ) values for hydrogen in plagioclase are lower...
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Schematic illustration of the interactions between ions and target material...
Published: 01 January 2010
Figure 16. Schematic illustration of the interactions between ions and target material. The sequence of events following an elastic (nuclear) collision is depicted in (a) at an atomic scale (after Dearnaley et al. 1973 ). These collisions create Frenkel defects, as discussed in the text. A more
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Schematic diagrams of common <span class="search-highlight">defects</span> in α-quartz. The schematic representat...
Published: 01 August 2009
, the interstitial atomic O, etc. The recombination of this defect pair to reform the original defect free quartz configuration results in a CL emission at ∼2.7 eV. Alternatively, the STE may relax non-radiatively to form a close pair of Frenkel defects (e.g. O vacancy and interstitial O, O vacancy and peroxy
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2017
Clays and Clay Minerals (2017) 65 (5): 371–375.
... comments in Wampler (2017) regarding Sassi et al. (2016) , the focus of which is on ab initio calculation of threshold displacement energies (TDEs) for atoms in vermiculite, and the relative probabilities for Frenkel-defect formation among atom types arising from radioisotopes of the kind...
Journal Article
Published: 01 February 2000
The Canadian Mineralogist (2000) 38 (1): 119–130.
... defect structures in metamict titanite are amorphous regions that are generated by radiation damage related to radiogenic impurities (Chrosch et al. 1998). Radiation damage produces defects that can be classified into two groups. Firstly, Frenkel defects are produced primarily by the collision of α...
FIGURES | View All (13)
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<span class="search-highlight">Defect</span> concentrations of Na ( X  Na* ) determined from experiment (dots) an...
Published: 01 November 2017
Figure 5. Defect concentrations of Na ( X Na* ) determined from experiment (dots) and the calculated Frenkel pair defect concentrations (solid curve) using the activation energy shown in the diagram. Details are provided in the text.
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2017
Clays and Clay Minerals (2017) 65 (5): 367–370.
..., about one atomic displacement per 137 Cs decay event (in pollucite). Consequently, the low probability of Rutherford back-scattering is more important to the present discussion for what it tells about the spatial distribution of β decay-induced Frenkel defects than for what it tells about the number...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 1992
Journal of the Geological Society (1992) 149 (2): 261–264.
... K. S. V. Aitken M. J. Annual dose conversion factors for TL and ESR dating Archaeometry 1986 28 202 205 Odom A. L. Rink W. J. Natural accumulation of Schottky-Frenkel defects: implications for a quartz geochronometer Geology 1989 17 55 58 Rink J. Odom L...
Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 November 1970
Economic Geology (1970) 65 (7): 856–861.
...David J. McDougall Abstract Thermoluminescence proportional to total number of defects, difference in dislocations (at or near equilibrium with existing thermal environment) and Frenkel imperfections (in metastable state and reflecting temperature of formation) GeoRef, Copyright 2008, American...
Journal Article
Published: 01 August 1952
American Mineralogist (1952) 37 (7-8): 637–655.
... results from motion of Frenkel oxygen defects. On this hypothesis, the coefficient of self-diffusion of oxygen in quartz at 500° C. is found to be approximately 3×10 -11 cm. 2 /sec. It is suggested also that diffusion of foreign univalent ions occurs mainly through vacant oxygen lattice positions...
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2001
American Mineralogist (2001) 86 (4): 498–512.
... (Frenkel defect pairs) produced by elastic collisions; and (3) the lateral distribution patterns of the resulting damage. These data were then used to estimate defect densities in the observed radiohaloes. T able 4. Results of Monte Carlo calculations Nr. α-decay event α-energy[MeV...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2015
Mineralogical Magazine (2015) 79 (6): 1455–1466.
..., eventually resulting in a concentration of Frenkel (interstitial) defect accumulation following sufficient energy loss. Ionization effects (such as electron holes and consequent charge imbalances) are likely to anneal or recombine through time, whilst the more enduring structural defects can remain...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2006
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2006) 62 (1): 67–83.
...Kate Wright For a Frenkel defect, the energy is simply the sum of the corresponding vacancy and interstitial energies. Point defects occur in all crystals at temperatures above 0 K and, in pure crystals, there will be a finite population of these intrinsic defects in thermodynamic...
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Journal Article
Published: 02 January 2003
Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2003) 53 (1): 387–425.
... to determine the formation energies of vacancy and Frenkel defects in zircon ( Meis and Gale 1998 , Williford et al. 1999 , Akhtar and Waseem 2001 , Park et al. 2001 ). The standard method for determining the formation energy of a vacancy is to calculate the difference in bulk potential energy...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 February 2014
The Canadian Mineralogist (2014) 52 (1): 91–100.
... , Malcherek et al. 1999 , 2001 ). The radiation damage in titanite (resulting from radioactive-decay of incorporated U and Th) can be described as a percolation transition with ingrowth of amorphous material with increasing dose, while at the same time Frenkel defects accumulate in the crystalline...
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