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Cliona

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Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1985
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1985) 55 (5): 705–711.
...Kelly Lee Acker; Michael J. Risk Abstract The boring sponge Cliona caribbaea is ubiquitous on the shallow terraces around Grand Cayman Island, British West Indies, occurring as brown sheets covering and growing over both live corals and hard substrate. Throughout the zone of the radial grooves...
Journal Article
Published: 01 May 1977
Journal of Paleontology (1977) 51 (3): 520–526.
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1974
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1974) 44 (1): 79–84.
...Dieter K. Futterer Abstract The marine siliceous boring sponge Cliona boring into carbonate substrates of biogenic or non-biogenic origin produces characteristic particles of 15 to 100 micron in size. These particles were quantitatively determined without difficulties by grain size analysis using...
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FIGURE 4 —Boring traces. A) Traces of the boring sponge  <b>Cliona</b>  ( Entobia ...
in > PALAIOS
Published: 01 September 2008
FIGURE 4 —Boring traces. A) Traces of the boring sponge Cliona ( Entobia isp.) on a shell of Tellina gouldii from sample station L7. B) Boring traces of predating gastropods of the family Muricidae ( Oichnus simplex , cylindrical). C) Boring traces of predating gastropods of the family
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1969
AAPG Bulletin (1969) 53 (3): 727–728.
... such as Cliona ) are filled with lithified sand, micrite, or acicular crystalline cement. Just beneath the reef surface is extensive lithification of poorly sorted micritic sediments between and within the framework. Sand trapped in interframework cavities is consolidated by drusy cements. In many places...
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1985
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (1985) 22 (1): 136–140.
... of a sponge (? Cliona sp.). A radiocarbon date of 8250 ± 320 years BP (GSC-3433) on several Hiatella valves from the burrows gives the age of a sea-level stand at 8 m asl at the locality, during which penecontemporaneous surf erosion or beach gravel deposition led to the demise of the shells. Other unoccupied...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1984
AAPG Bulletin (1984) 68 (7): 950.
... ), sipunculid worms ( Phascolosoma and Themiste ), and clinoid sponges ( Cliona ). Abundances are locally high (e.g., up to 120 sipunculids per 1,000 m 3 of rock). Other prominent but slightly less abundant borers include bryozoans, regular echinoids, and polychaete annelids (eunicids, spionids, and possibly...
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1976
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1976) 46 (1): 174–187.
... species of Halimeda can be useful sediment tracers, with H. goreauii and H. opuntia being characteristic of fore-reef slope environments and H. cryptica essentially restricted to the deep fore-reef. The present study confirms that boring sponges particularly Cliona sp. generate significant quantities...
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FIGURE 10 —Bioerosion of shells in bags. (A) Percentage of shells with bioe...
in > PALAIOS
Published: 01 April 2002
FIGURE 10 —Bioerosion of shells in bags. (A) Percentage of shells with bioeroding organisms (primarily Cliona ), all taxa combined. (B) Average size of Cliona cover for shells with borings, all taxa combined. (C) Box plot showing medians, first and third quartiles, 95% confidence limits
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—Photograph of epoxy-impregnated peel (relief cast) of box core containing ...
Published: 01 July 1973
FIG. 8. —Photograph of epoxy-impregnated peel (relief cast) of box core containing shell accumulations. Core consists primarily of shells, shell fragments, and coarse sand overlying laminated mud. Most shells are from oysters; some valves have been bored by sponge Cliona .
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FIGURE 5. Scanning electron microscope photos of deep water macroid sample ...
in > PALAIOS
Published: 01 April 2011
FIGURE 5. Scanning electron microscope photos of deep water macroid sample (95–104 m water depth), off Kikai-jima, northern Ryukyu Islands, Japan. A) View of a macroid outer surface extensively bored probably by the sponge Cliona producing traces assigned to the ichnogenus Entobia (arrows). B
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 1982
Bulletin de la Société Géologique de France (1982) S7-XXIV (4): 849–854.
...Saloua Gargouri GeoRef, Copyright 2008, American Geological Institute. Reference includes data from PASCAL, Institute de l'Information Scientifique et Technique, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, France 1982 Africa Arthropoda Bivalvia borings Cenomanian Cirripedia Cliona Cretaceous Crustacea...
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FIGURE 8 —Encrustation and bioerosion of natural and fossil shells. Percent...
in > PALAIOS
Published: 01 April 2002
FIGURE 8 —Encrustation and bioerosion of natural and fossil shells. Percentages of shell surfaces covered by animal encrusters, coralline algae, and borings (primarily Cliona ) are shown for 11 groups of shells (see Table 4 for descriptions of groups) from six environments: Semarang—clastic muds
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Archaeocyaths and modern demosponges used in study. A, Archaeocyath from we...
Published: 05 March 2019
, Cliona patera , MPM 53. Starred specimen is vertically exaggerated. G, Archaeocyath capturing ambient current. Angle (x) must be large enough to allow flow to reach main cup. H, Cross section of archaeocyath cup with septa redirecting and channelizing current into central cavity. Scale bars, 10 mm (A, B
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Scanning-electron-microscopy images of silt- and clay-size constituents in ...
Published: 01 October 2015
). Note how grains preferentially break between these structural elements. E) Whole and fragmented benthic diatoms (d) (opaline silica) atop a larger grain. F) Chip produced by boring sponge, Cliona sp. Note ultrastructure of grain shows stacked plates similar to those of Trichomya sp. (arrow
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Bioerosion traces in casts of the backshore collected shells of  N. macromp...
in > PALAIOS
Published: 01 July 2015
Fig. 5.— Bioerosion traces in casts of the backshore collected shells of N. macromphalus (AMNH 97753–97756). A ) I. Entobia nana produced by Cliona or another hadromerid sponge (AMNH 97755). B ) Cluster of the fungal trace i. Flagrichnus profundus produced by Schizochytrium sp. (AMNH
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A)  Sample BI1–23 from the lower, less-bioeroded  A. palmata  facies ( Ap  ...
Published: 01 January 2005
Figure 8 A) Sample BI1–23 from the lower, less-bioeroded A. palmata facies ( Ap = A. palmata ). The dominant borers are the mollusc Lithophaga spp. (M) and sponges (S), probably Cliona spp. Note the already cemented sediment fill in the mollusc burrow at the upper left (Ms
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Bioerosion traces in casts of the deep-water collected shells of  Nautilus ...
in > PALAIOS
Published: 01 July 2015
) Complex arrangements of ←i. I. elegans , i. R. cf. catenata , and the ‘extremely thin form’ likely produced by the rhodophytes Bangia sp. or Porphyra sp. (personal communication S. Golubic) (AMNH 55916; 395 m). D ) I. Entobia isp. produced by Cliona or another hadromerid sponge (AMNH 55916
Journal Article
Journal: PALAIOS
Published: 01 April 2002
PALAIOS (2002) 17 (2): 171–191.
...FIGURE 10 —Bioerosion of shells in bags. (A) Percentage of shells with bioeroding organisms (primarily Cliona ), all taxa combined. (B) Average size of Cliona cover for shells with borings, all taxa combined. (C) Box plot showing medians, first and third quartiles, 95% confidence limits...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 July 2006
Journal of Paleontology (2006) 80 (4): 760–767.
...) and C. Fricker (Field Museum, Chicago) for facilitating the loan of type specimens used in this study. REFERENCES Acker , K. L. , M. J. , and Risk , 1985 , Substrate destruction and sediment production by the boring sponge Cliona caribbaea on Grand Cayman Island : Journal...
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