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Champagne Pool

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Journal Article
Published: 01 March 2005
Journal of the Geological Society (2005) 162 (2): 323-331.
...Vernon R. Phoenix; Robin W. Renaut; Brian Jones; F. Grant Ferris Abstract Siliceous sinter, loose sediments, and suspended flocs in Champagne Pool, an anoxic hot (75 °C) spring at Waiotapu, New Zealand, are composed of opaline silica and metal-rich sulphides that contain many well-preserved...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Journal Article
Published: 01 November 2001
Journal of the Geological Society (2001) 158 (6): 895-911.
...BRIAN JONES; ROBIN W. RENAUT; MICHAEL R. ROSEN Abstract Champagne Pool, a large hot spring at Waiotapu in North Island, New Zealand, is rimmed by a subaerial sinter dam and a shallow subaqueous shelf that is composed of orange sinter rich in metallic sulphides. Orange siliceous flocs, also rich...
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Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 June 2005
Economic Geology (2005) 100 (4): 677-687.
... concentrations are elevated within Champagne Pool and in precipitates surrounding this spring. Therefore, it is likely that the reservoir fluid that feeds springs at Waiotapu also contains dissolved gold. Champagne Pool has the highest gold concentration measured in this study, 109 ngL –1 dissolved and 362 ngL...
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Macroscopic features of <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b>, Waiotapu. (A) Western <b>pool</b> margin s...
Published: 26 November 2003
Fig. 5. Macroscopic features of Champagne Pool, Waiotapu. (A) Western pool margin showing raised ledge (∼ 30 cm above water surface) overhanging pool edge (L). At the current water level there is extensive growth of spicular microstromatolites (S). The orange sinter shelf (Sh) is visible below
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Field trip participants at the famous <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b> in the Waiotapu geothe...
Published: 01 October 2016
Field trip participants at the famous Champagne Pool in the Waiotapu geothermal area. Photograph by T. Monecke.
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<b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b>, New Zealand. The colourful colloids of S, As and Sb serve t...
Published: 01 April 2014
Figure 3.2 Champagne Pool, New Zealand. The colourful colloids of S, As and Sb serve to demonstrate that, although much of the geothermal water originated as local rainfall, the high concentrations of many other elements require a magmatic origin.
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Location and setting of <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b>. ( a ) Location of Taupo Volcanic Zo...
Published: 01 March 2005
Fig. 1.  Location and setting of Champagne Pool. ( a ) Location of Taupo Volcanic Zone (inset) and Waiotapu, North Island, New Zealand. ( b ) Sketch plan of Champagne Pool showing sampling sites A and B. ( c ) Cross-section through sinter rim and shelf around margin of Champagne Pool (after
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Sinter shelf around <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b>. ( a ) Shallow, orange, subaqueous sinte...
Published: 01 March 2005
Fig. 2.  Sinter shelf around Champagne Pool. ( a ) Shallow, orange, subaqueous sinter shelf showing stromatolites (St), loose sediment (S), and grey subaerial sinter rim. (Site A in Fig. 1b. ) ( b ) Silica stromatolites rich in As–Sb sulphides on subaqueous sinter shelf. Loose sediment (S
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( a ) Speciation plot of dissolved arsenic species in <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b> genera...
Published: 01 March 2005
Fig. 9.  ( a ) Speciation plot of dissolved arsenic species in Champagne Pool generated using GWB React code and the data in Table 1 . The domination of neutral or negatively charged thio-, oxide and hydroxide complexes should be noted. Arrow indicates f O of spring water. The species H 2 AsO 4
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Experimental sinter growths on glass slides from <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b>. (A) After ...
Published: 26 November 2003
Fig. 6. Experimental sinter growths on glass slides from Champagne Pool. (A) After 30 days, small spicules (∼ 1 mm) have developed on the top edges of the slides (shown magnified). Plastic holder is covered with growth of filamentous material covered in orange sulfur. (B) After 4 months, spicule
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( a ) General view of <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b> (CP) and Artist’s Palette (AP) looking...
Published: 01 November 2001
Fig. 2. ( a ) General view of Champagne Pool (CP) and Artist’s Palette (AP) looking to the west. ( b ) Northern margin of Champagne Pool showing sinter rim and subaqueous shelf. Arrows indicates shelf edge. ( c ) Subaqueous shelf covered with stromatolites that are formed of orange siliceous
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Stromatolitic sinters from shelf around <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b>. Lightest laminae ha...
Published: 01 November 2001
Fig. 4. Stromatolitic sinters from shelf around Champagne Pool. Lightest laminae have deepest yellowish-orange colour. ( a ) Thinly laminated stromatolitic sinter. ( b ) Digitate stromatolites that nucleated on old sinter mass (arrows). ( c ) Coniform stromatolites.
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Microbes from stromatolites on subaqueous shelf around <b>Champagne</b> <b>Pool</b>. ( a ...
Published: 01 November 2001
Fig. 5. Microbes from stromatolites on subaqueous shelf around Champagne Pool. ( a ) Filamentous microbes on outer surface of stromatolite. Note variance in size of filaments. ( b ) Stromatolite surface showing large diameter, collapsed, non-mineralized filamentous microbes overlying masses
Journal Article
Journal: PALAIOS
Published: 01 June 1997
PALAIOS (1997) 12 (3): 220-236.
...Brian Jones; Robin W. Renaut; Michael R. Rosen Abstract Clusters of microstromatolites, up to 10 mm high with a basal diameter of 4 mm, grow on twigs and small islands in shallow hot-spring waters around Champagne Pool and on Primrose Terrace at Waiotapu, New Zealand. Similar microstromatolites...
Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 October 1985
Economic Geology (1985) 80 (6): 1640-1668.
..., including the Champagne Pool which was formed 900 years ago, continue to discharge chloride water directly from the deeper hydrothermal reservoir. Precipitates formed within this pool are enriched in arsenic, antimony, thallium, and mercury and are ore grade with respect to gold and silver. Two chemical...
Journal Article
Published: 01 February 1999
Journal of the Geological Society (1999) 156 (1): 89-103.
...BRIAN JONES; ROBIN W. RENAUT; MICHAEL R. ROSEN Abstract Oncoids that are actively growing in some of the shallow-water pools around Champagne Pool, Waiotapu, New Zealand, are formed of amorphous silica (opal-A) with minor amounts of native sulphur. The growth of these oncoids is being mediated...
Journal Article
Published: 25 July 2019
Geochemistry: Exploration, Environment, Analysis (2019) geochem2019-047.
..., significantly higher concentrations of Ag, Au, Sb, As, Cs and Rb were present in samples close to Champagne Pool than elsewhere confirming its location as the main outflow source of Au, Ag and their pathfinder elements. The fern survey areas at Luck at Last mine, Pine Sinter and Ohui in the CVZ each exhibited...
Journal Article
Published: 26 November 2003
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (2003) 40 (11): 1643-1667.
...Fig. 5. Macroscopic features of Champagne Pool, Waiotapu. (A) Western pool margin showing raised ledge (∼ 30 cm above water surface) overhanging pool edge (L). At the current water level there is extensive growth of spicular microstromatolites (S). The orange sinter shelf (Sh) is visible below...
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Journal Article
Journal: PALAIOS
Published: 01 October 1999
PALAIOS (1999) 14 (5): 475-492.
...Brian Jones; Robin W. Renaut; Michael R. Rosen Abstract Siliceous coated grains (oncoids) are common on parts of Primrose Terrace, which is a large sinter apron below Champagne Pool in the Waiotapu geothermal area of North Island, New Zealand. Some oncoids are discoidal with smooth exteriors (Group...
Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.1144/GSL.SP.2007.273.01.14
EISBN: 9781862395213
... went to the site, where he found a huge pool of water (Lake Awing). He and Mba’nka called the elders, who came and took the Fon and his followers into the lake for the necessary sacrifices. Later, they returned home without looking behind them and since that time, sacrifices (which may or may...
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