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Catahoula Tuff

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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1966
AAPG Bulletin (1966) 50 (3): 624.
...Earle F. McBride Abstract The Catahoula Tuff of Oligocene to early Miocene(?) age is composed almost entirely of volcanic rock debris or its alteration products. Pastel-colored tuffaceous clay predominates, but sandstone, conglomerate, bentonite, vitric tuff, and ash also are present. The rocks...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1975
AAPG Bulletin (1975) 59 (5): 766–779.
... are in tuffaceous, zeolitic sandstone and mudstone beds that strike northeastward and dip gently southeastward. These host rocks are included in the Whitsett Formation of late Eocene age, Frio Clay of Oligocene(?) age, Catahoula Tuff and Oakville Sandstone of Miocene age, and Goliad Sand of Pliocene age. Uranium...
FIGURES | View All (9)
Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 December 1978
Economic Geology (1978) 73 (8): 1677–1689.
...R. L. Reynolds; M. B. Goldhaber Abstract The detrital Fe-Ti oxide minerals and their authigenic alteration products in samples from cores spanning 1.7 km across a roll-type uranium deposit in the mid-Tertiary Catahoula Tuff, south Texas, record important information on host-rock preparation...
Journal Article
Published: 01 December 1932
Journal of Sedimentary Research (1932) 2 (3): 135–139.
... as that of the Catahoula tuffs to the southwest, while the source of the one Cretaceous deposit investigated cannot be determined at present. (3) The mineral of the fuller's earths is related to the minerals of the montmorillonite-beidellite group but represents a species as yet undescribed. GeoRef, Copyright 2006...
Journal Article
Journal: Economic Geology
Published: 01 December 1978
Economic Geology (1978) 73 (8): 1690–1705.
...M. B. Goldhaber; R. L. Reynolds; R. O. Rye Abstract Petrologic and sulfur isotopic studies have been carried out on drill core samples from a roll-type uranium deposit in the mid-Tertiary Catahoula Tuff, Webb County, south Texas. Epigenetic iron disulfide minerals formed in two distinct stages...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1933
AAPG Bulletin (1933) 17 (5): 523–525.
... formations and zones are described. A caliche mantle is present, being thickest southwest of the town of Goliad. Chalcedony, forming knobs in the Lagarto outcrop area, is believed to have had its source in the Catahoula tuff. Chalcedony may have formed where underground water moved up fault planes...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1932
AAPG Bulletin (1932) 16 (1): 101–102.
... from it. After an attempt to restrict the name Frio to it apparently all are now happily agreed that it is the southward continuation of the Catahoula formation and that it shall be called the Catahoula tuff. (3). The unit between the Catahoula tuff and the Fayette was mapped separately by Bailey...
Image
F ig . 7. Strong field thermomagnetic curves of magnetic mineral separates....
Published: 01 September 2001
Catahoula Tuff (in a uranium-bearing sandstone facies), south Texas coastal plain, is shown for comparison. Of these examples, the Wasatch and Catahoula samples contain magnetite (Curie temperature of 580°C ) in addition to ferrimagnetic ilmenite-hematite solid solution.
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1932
AAPG Bulletin (1932) 16 (3): 259–260.
...) then described (by Dumble, 1894) occurs in the upper Gueydan formation.” I was very glad to see in F. H. Lahee’s 6 article, which included an extract from a letter of W. C. Mendenhall to E. H. Finch, that the U. S. Geological Survey had decided to use “Catahoula tuff” for my “Gueydan” and the name, “Frio...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1940
AAPG Bulletin (1940) 24 (2): 376–382.
..., Catahoula Tuff. 1932. BAILEY, T. L., “Frio Clay, South Texas,” Bull. Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol. , Vol. 16, pp. 259–60. Defends restriction of Frio; accepts Catahoula Tuff for Gueydan. 1932. COOK, C. E., “Areal Geology of the Catahoula Formation in Gonzales and Karnes Counties,” Univ. Texas...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1949
AAPG Bulletin (1949) 33 (11): 1904–1906.
... an earlier point of view. 8 Accepting the Frio in its redefined sense, correlations with surface outcrops show it to be part of T. L. Bailey’s 9 Gueydan, or the Catahoula tuff. This tuffaceous group seems to be the equivalent of the Catahoula sandstone of Louisiana, the type locality for the Catahoula...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1939
AAPG Bulletin (1939) 23 (12): 1873–1874.
... limestone overlies the La Chusa tuffs. These clays are distinctly different from Catahoula deposits, and are referred to the Oakville formation, due to their lithologic character and position in section. The Catahoula and Oakville are overlapped by Lissie or post-Pleistocene conglomerate throughout north...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1959
AAPG Bulletin (1959) 43 (11): 2623–2635.
... is exposed there in an almost continuous section; it is underlain by the Stones Switch sandstone member and overlain unconformably by the Catahoula tuff of Miocene(?) age in a spectacular exposure in the quarry walls. This locality is about 31 miles southwest of the Dubose Ranch locality in Gonzales County...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1933
AAPG Bulletin (1933) 17 (7): 816–826.
... in the northwest corner of the ranch exposes the underlying Oakville sandstone and its contact with the Catahoula tuff. An attempt has been made to map the surface formations. This was found to be of no value except in the areas where the hills are covered with red sandy material. This sand is a lower Lissie...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 May 1933
AAPG Bulletin (1933) 17 (5): 526–547.
.... It contained the largest grains of glassy material found in this area. The Catahoula, as already stated, consists of tuffs, green hackly fractured clays, local lenses of sand, and ash beds. The ash beds are interspersed through the section and are traceable as horizons, but not as persistent beds...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 November 1966
AAPG Bulletin (1966) 50 (11): 2344–2365.
..., some degree of stream rejuvenation is suggested. The Anahuac Formation of the subsurface ( Fig. 2 ), which is stratigraphically higher than the basal Fant Tuff Member and Paynes Hammock Sand part of the Catahoula-Tampa, is clearly a marine transgressive unit ( Stuckey, 1964 , p. 212; Walton, 1964 , p...
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Series: AAPG Memoir
Published: 01 January 1968
DOI: 10.1306/M8361C11
EISBN: 9781629812304
...Abstract Abstract The outcrop area of the Gueydan (Catahoula) Formation of South Texas is characterized by geologic features which are common to provinces of sedimentary volcanism. Evidence for sedimentary volcanism includes relict mud-volcano vents (silica knobs) along deep-seated faults...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 June 1933
AAPG Bulletin (1933) 17 (6): 613–655.
... with the Miocene “Tampa limestone” of Florida as the marine equivalent of the Catahoula sandstone. 1 Read before the Association at the Houston meeting, March 23, 1933. Decision as to whether the term “Wilcox” (proper use of which is questioned in this article) shall be continued, due to its common usage...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 June 1978
AAPG Bulletin (1978) 62 (6): 1049–1062.
... of the Catahoula is less than that common in tuffs of similar composition ( Duex, 1971 ; Bunker and Mackallor, 1973 ). Nevertheless the geologic relation of the Catahoula to host rocks in the south Texas deposits is not clear. The Catahoula Formation extends from southwest Texas northeast into Louisiana; uranium...
FIGURES | View All (4)
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1931
AAPG Bulletin (1931) 15 (8): 967–970.
... of the sandstone and clay facies of the typical Catahoula into the volcanic tuffs and fluviatile deposits of the Gueydan. The Catahoula itself, however, contains tuff and bentonite beds seemingly from the same volcanic source as the material of the Gueydan of Bailey. 3 It is therefore logical to extend the term...