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Cape Fear

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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1971
AAPG Bulletin (1971) 55 (1): 110-115.
Journal Article
Published: 01 June 1968
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (1968) 58 (3): 821-834.
...John J. Dowling abstractDuring the East Coast OnShore-OffShore Experiment (ECOOE) two lines of instrumented buoys were anchored on the continental shelf between Cape Hatteras and Cape Fear. One line extended from near shore to the 100 fathom depth contour. The other line was parallel to and near...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1959
GSA Bulletin (1959) 70 (4): 437-466.
... as granitic basement, which has compressional velocities of 5.82–6.1 km/sec. At the southern extremity it is at a dept of 6 km, shoals to 0.86 km near Cape Fear, and deepens north of Cape Hatteras to more than 3 km. North of Charleston, South Carolina, there is excellent depth correlation with granitic...
Image
Shaded-relief bathymetry of the Blake Ridge and <b>Cape</b> <b>Fear</b> diapir complex (A...
in > Geology
Published: 01 July 2013
Figure 1. Shaded-relief bathymetry of the Blake Ridge and Cape Fear diapir complex (Atlantic margin of the United States) (20 m grid resolution). Boxes and black lines (L81 and L21) denote other figure and seismic reflection profile locations. Inset map shows study area relative to the U.S. East
Image
A: Plan view of AUV  Sentry –collected bathymetry at the <b>Cape</b> <b>Fear</b> diapir. ...
in > Geology
Published: 01 July 2013
Figure 3. A: Plan view of AUV Sentry –collected bathymetry at the Cape Fear diapir. Blue circle denotes location of water-column anomaly (B). Red stars mark Ocean Drilling Program Sites 991 and 992. White dashed line delineates chemosynthetic communities (clams and bacterial mats). B: Oblique
Image
Data from the <b>Cape</b> <b>Fear</b> site. (a) Combined 50- and     100  -  MHz     25-f...
in > Geophysics
Published: 27 March 2007
Figure 7. Data from the Cape Fear site. (a) Combined 50- and 100 - MHz 25-fold stack. The soil disturbance caused by excavation and backfill is evident from 70 to 82 m . (b) The peak-frequency distribution. (c) The D distribution shows a zone of decreased dispersion
Image
Figure 4. (A) Surficial map of <b>Cape</b> <b>Fear</b> River valley in southeastern North...
Published: 01 February 2000
Figure 4. (A) Surficial map of Cape Fear River valley in southeastern North Carolina. Central zone of river anomalies (ZRA-C) denoted by striped pattern. CFA—Cape Fear arch. (B) Cross-valley topographic profile (A–A′ in B) displaying down-to-the-southwest cross-valley tilt with channel located
Image
Figure 8. Topographic profiles across the <b>Cape</b> <b>Fear</b> River and its youngest ...
Published: 01 February 2000
Figure 8. Topographic profiles across the Cape Fear River and its youngest terrace (Wando, early Pleistocene; Owens, 1989 ) near the central zone of river anomalies (ZRA-C). Arrowheads in cross sections indicate channel location. Area in location map with short-dash pattern denotes reach
Image
Figure 9. Average sinuosities along Lynches, Lumber, and <b>Cape</b> <b>Fear</b> Rivers. ...
Published: 01 February 2000
Figure 9. Average sinuosities along Lynches, Lumber, and Cape Fear Rivers. Valley segment lengths used for calculating average sinuosity are 2 km for Lynches and Lumber Rivers and 4 km for Cape Fear River. Horizontal solid lines are locations of river curves and areas of increased incision (I
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1970
GSA Bulletin (1970) 81 (9): 2577-2598.
... Hatteras, North Carolina, and Fort Lauderdale, Florida, four distinct physiographic areas are delineated, each having characteristic morphologies and lithologies.The ridges and well-defined troughs on the outer shelf and upper slope (depths of about 50 to 150 m) between Cape Hatteras and Cape Fear may...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 11 May 2017
GSA Bulletin (2017) 129 (9-10): 1140-1157.
... and Tertiary Coastal Plain sediments from the Cape Fear arch in North Carolina to eastern Alabama; these highs decrease with distance from the Piedmont. Quaternary sediments along the modern coasts show weaker eTh anomalies, except near coast-parallel ridges from South Carolina to northern Florida. Prominent...
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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 June 1967
GSA Bulletin (1967) 78 (6): 749-772.
...JOHN F HUBERT; WILLIAM J NEAL AbstractThe western North Atlantic petrologic province consists of terrigenous sands of glacial and postglacial age on the shelf and in the deep sea, north of a line extending east of Cape Fear, North Carolina. The province includes the northern part of the Hatteras...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 March 1960
AAPG Bulletin (1960) 44 (3): 298-315.
... sediments. 3) The buried Florence Triassic basin is approximately 40 mi. long on an ENE. strike and limited in width to 13 mi. A new buried Triassic basin is postulated to extend from near Raeford into Johnson County, North Carolina. 4) The Cape Fear arch is a prominent basement structure with a seaward...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 January 1971
GSA Bulletin (1971) 82 (1): 59-66.
... to be fortuitous. Cape Fear, North Carolina, and Cape Romain-Santee Point, South Carolina, coincide with the mouths of rivers; lesser capes at Tybee and Little St. Simons Islands correspond to the discharge areas of major Georgia rivers. Cape Lookout, North Carolina, is postulated to correspond to a shoal area...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 April 1987
Geology (1987) 15 (4): 327-332.
...Peter Popenoe; Vernon J. Henry; Faisal M. Idris AbstractAnalyses of seismic reflection profiles and stratigraphic data indicate a continuation of the Gulf trough trend across eastern South Carolina and offshore between Cape Fear and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Seismic profiles show a linear...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1978
GSA Bulletin (1978) 89 (2): 277-282.
... relict oyster shells of Crassostrea virginica (Gmelin) collected within a relatively narrow area of the continental shelf from north of Cape Hatteras to Cape Fear (less than 40,000 km2) in depths to 60 m. Data indicate significant postdepositional and landward transport of these shells, calling...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 July 2013
Geology (2013) 41 (7): 807-810.
...Figure 1. Shaded-relief bathymetry of the Blake Ridge and Cape Fear diapir complex (Atlantic margin of the United States) (20 m grid resolution). Boxes and black lines (L81 and L21) denote other figure and seismic reflection profile locations. Inset map shows study area relative to the U.S. East...
FIGURES
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 January 2002
GSA Bulletin (2002) 114 (1): 24-42.
... because it lies within a discrete hinge zone that accommodates structural movement between the Cape Fear arch and the Southeast Georgia embayment. In recent years, continuing growth in the greater Charleston urban area has provided new impetus for research on the shallow subsurface stratigraphy...
FIGURES | View All (16)
Series: DNAG, Continent-Ocean Transect Series
Published: 01 January 1991
DOI: 10.1130/DNAG-COT-E-4.1
EISBN: 9780813754383
... North American craton just west of the Grenville front near Lexington, Kentucky southeastward across Cape Fear, North Carolina, on the Atlantic coast to oceanic crust east of the Blake Spur magnetic anomaly. Like all of the other U.S. Atlantic coast transects, it crosses Cambrian and Jurassic...
Series: SEPM Field Trip Guidebook
Published: 01 January 1986
EISBN: 9781565762800
... a crystalline “basement” composed of metamorphosed sedimentary and igneous rocks like those of the Piedmont. Figure 1 shows the depth below sea level to the top of crystalline basement and delineates the major tectonic feature of the Coastal Plain, a southeast plunging basement high known as the Cape Fear Arch...