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Blytheville Arch

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Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 01 January 2013
DOI: 10.1130/2012.2493(01)
... The southern arm of the New Madrid seismic zone of the central United States coincides with the buried, ~110 km by ~20 km Blytheville Arch antiform within the Cambrian–Ordovician Reelfoot rift graben. The Blytheville Arch has been interpreted at various times as a compressive structure...
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1998
Seismological Research Letters (1998) 69 (4): 350–358.
...Anthony J. Crone Abstract Vibroseis seismic-reflection profiles around the southwestern end of the Blytheville arch document the southwesterly extent of the arch and refine the length of a fault zone that coincides with the arch. The 74.3 km of newly interpreted profiles and previously described...
Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1988
Seismological Research Letters (1988) 59 (4): 117–121.
...R.M. Hamilton; F.A. McKeown Abstract Seismic-reflection profiles across part of the New Madrid seismic zone in northeastern Arkansas and southeastern Missouri show a faulted and structurally complex zone, originally known as Charlie’s ridge but herein renamed Blytheville arch, which is about 10...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 November 1990
Geology (1990) 18 (11): 1158–1162.
...F. A. McKeown; R. M. Hamilton; S. F. Diehl; E. E. Glick Abstract Most of the earthquakes in the New Madrid seismic zone correlate spatially with the Blytheville arch and part of the Pascola arch, which are interpreted to be the same structure. Both arches may have formed by diapirism along the axis...
Series: GCSSEPM, GCSSEPM
Published: 01 December 2015
DOI: 10.5724/gcs.15.34.0345
EISBN: 978-1-944966-00-3
... structures (Blytheville arch and Pascola arch). The Blytheville arch is marked by a core of structurally thickened Elvins Shale, whereas the Pascola arch reflects the structural uplift of a portion of the entire rift basin. Structural uplift and faulting within the Reelfoot rift since the late Paleozoic...
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 2000
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2000) 90 (2): 345–356.
... called a trench. This trench is 50-km wide, has a maximum depth of 100 m, and appears to have formed during the Eocene. The trench's western boundary coincides with the Blytheville arch/Lake County uplift and its southeastern margin underlies Memphis, Tennessee. The Blytheville arch/Lake County uplift...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1992
Seismological Research Letters (1992) 63 (3): 243–247.
...Henri S. Swolfs Abstract New structural data in the southwestern extension of the New Madrid seismic zone show that the Upper Cambrian strata of the Blytheville arch recorded at least three episodes of deformation following initial rift formation. The earliest deformation is represented by a phase...
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1992
Seismological Research Letters (1992) 63 (3): 407–425.
... arising from slip on hypothetical faults that is driven by either coseismic or uniform regional strains. Tectonic deformation is reflected in the seismicity and in morphologic and geologic features including (1) the Lake County uplift, (2) Reelfoot Lake, (3) the deformed rocks of the Blytheville arch...
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1992
Seismological Research Letters (1992) 63 (3): 297–307.
... Madrid area, its northern projection near Sikeston, Missouri, and its southern projection near Blytheville, Arkansas at locations related to the Blytheville arch. A location several kilometers south of Charleston, Missouri, was also selected. Data presented in this paper consist of 7 line-kilometers...
Journal Article
Journal: Geosphere
Published: 01 December 2013
Geosphere (2013) 9 (6): 1819–1831.
..., indicating a displacement rate of ∼1.2 mm/yr. In the Eastern Lowlands, within the last 12 k.y., the Charleston uplift has been lifted 36 m, resulting in an average uplift rate of 3 mm/yr; Lake County (Reelfoot North fault) uplift is 21 m (1.8 mm/yr), Blytheville arch uplift is 25 m (2.1 mm/yr), Joiner Ridge...
FIGURES | View All (8)
Journal Article
Published: 01 July 1992
Seismological Research Letters (1992) 63 (3): 223–232.
.... The axis of this resistivity high generally follows the central part of the Reelfoot rift, but its orientation is offset several degrees from the enigmatic Blytheville arch. The MT structural high follows the main part of a northeast-trending seismicity belt, but in the New Madrid, Missouri area electrical...
Journal Article
Journal: Geology
Published: 01 June 1991
Geology (1991) 19 (6): 667–669.
Image
Figure 1. Location of Bootheel fault or lineament, <b>Blytheville</b> subsurface a...
Published: 01 March 2005
Figure 1. Location of Bootheel fault or lineament, Blytheville subsurface arch, and the Lake County uplift in the NMSZ. Our detailed study area ( Figs. 6 and 7 ) is at the intersection of A–A′ (Fig. 5) and BHL. Trench locations and seismic reflection studies of Schweig and Marple (1991
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2011
Seismological Research Letters (2011) 82 (1): 132–140.
...–Blytheville arch (CG-BA) strike-slip fault is associated with the Blytheville arch while the Pascola arch hosts the Reelfoot fault, a NW-trending reverse fault. The northern half of the Reelfoot fault serves as a left-step accommodation fault for the CG-BA strike-slip fault and another strike-slip fault...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Journal Article
Published: 01 February 2004
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2004) 94 (1): 64–75.
... include the Blytheville Arch segment, and (3) NM1 and NM3 were larger than NM2. Mueller and Pujol ( 2001 ) used estimates of the displacement during NM3 and the area of the Reelfoot fault to conclude that M for NM3 on the Reelfoot blind thrust was 7.2–7.4. While the historical accounts of changes...
FIGURES | View All (10)
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1997
Seismological Research Letters (1997) 68 (5): 785–796.
..., Fall Meeting , 437 . Mckeown , F.A. , R.M. Hamilton , S.F. Diehl , and E.E. Glick ( 1990 ). Diapiric origin of the Blytheville and Pascola Arches in the Reelfoot rift, east-central United States: Relation to New Madrid seismicity , Geology , 18 , 1158 – 1162...
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2002
Seismological Research Letters (2002) 73 (5): 698–731.
... neotectonic and seismic history, which is also attributable to strain partitioning along the zones of accommodation. The northern tectonic domain constitutes part of the Mississippi River arch, which lies north of St. Louis, Missouri. This arch separates the northern part of the Illinois basin from the Forest...
FIGURES | View All (18)
Image
Map of the 5 January 1843 earthquake. See caption for  Figure 7 . The black...
Published: 01 February 2003
Figure 8. Map of the 5 January 1843 earthquake. See caption for Figure 7 . The black lines are the trends of locations of small earthquakes in the NMSZ. Our preferred location is on the Blytheville Arch segment (B).
Image
Fault segmentation of the NMSZ (adapted from  figure 9  of Johnston and Sch...
Published: 01 February 2004
Figure 3. Fault segmentation of the NMSZ (adapted from figure 9 of Johnston and Schweig [ 1996 ]). Candidate rupture segments: BA, Blytheville arch; BFZ, Blytheville fault zone; BL, Bootheel lineament; NW, New Madrid west; NN, New Madrid north; RF, Reelfoot fault; RS, Reelfoot south. Segments
Image
▴ Tectonic setting of the New Madrid seismic zone showing the Mississippi e...
Published: 01 March 2010
-Blytheville arch. RF is Reelfoot arch.