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Barstovian age

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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1990
GSA Bulletin (1990) 102 (4): 459–477.
.... Strata about 40 m below the position of the Oreodont Tuff and extending 270 m higher than the Oreodont Tuff, in the middle member of the Barstow Formation, contain fossil mammals of the Green Hills Fauna, of early Barstovian age. The Cupidinimus lindsayi Assemblage Zone also begins about 40 m...
Journal Article
Published: 01 April 1963
Rocky Mountain Geology (1963) 2 (1): 81–85.
... to balsam, alteration, abrasion, and color do not appear to be useful in stratigraphic correlation. Variation in the shape of shards may be valuable in distinguishing certain ash falls. An ash fall of late Miocene (Barstovian) age of considerable extent was noted to have shards with a distinctive needle...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 August 1990
GSA Bulletin (1990) 102 (8): 1093–1104.
... to at least 14.3 Ma, and possibly to 13.8 Ma. The magnetic data help to constrain the Barstovian land-mammal age in the northern Rocky Mountains, as well as two interval zones defined within it. The major faunal boundary ages determined here are indistin-guishable from ages for these same boundaries...
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2008
Rocky Mountain Geology (2008) 43 (1): 41–110.
...Michael Cassiliano Abstract Wyomylus whitei is a new genus and species of stenomyline camel from the Moonstone Formation (late Barstovian–earliest Hemphillian, middle–late Miocene) of central Wyoming. W. whitei , the youngest known species of the Stenomylinae, is a small, gracile camel...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 July 2004
Journal of Paleontology (2004) 78 (4): 731–740.
... of the group. The fauna of Hepburn's Mesa, Montana, is mid-Miocene (Barstovian North American Land Mammal Age) and includes abundant small mammal remains ( Burbank and Barnosky, 1990 ). It has been interpreted to represent an arid or semiarid environment ( Barnosky and Labar, 1989 ) due to the great...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 March 1998
Journal of Paleontology (1998) 72 (2): 388–397.
... the same area of exposures. Sites of Barstovian age near the Kilgore Flora site indicate that grasses were commonly found in the region. The results presented here support the hypothesis that grassland savanna vegetation was widely distributed in the northern Great Plains by the Clarendonian age. GeoRef...
Journal Article
Published: 01 September 1960
Journal of Paleontology (1960) 34 (5): 950–956.
...John E. Mawby Abstract A jaw of Barstovian age [Tertiary] from Oregon resembles Heterosorex sansaniensis (Lartet) and is probably a new North American species of that genus. Domnina compressa Galbreath [from Colorado] is a primitive heterosoricine and should be referred to the genus Heterosorex...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1973
AAPG Bulletin (1973) 57 (2): 436–437.
...-invertebrate “ages,” Mohnian and? Delmontian (in part?) foraminiferal ages. Late to middle Miocene (12-17 m.y. ago) Barstovian mammal “age,” Briones and upper part of Temblor mega-invertebrate “age,” later part of Saucesian plus Relizian and Luisian foraminiferal ages. Middle to early Miocene (17-21 m.y. ago...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 April 1990
GSA Bulletin (1990) 102 (4): 478–493.
... mammalian faunas characterize the Barstovian land-mammal age, previous isotopic ages on interbedded tuffs have been used to calibrate middle Miocene time, and it was deposited in a tectonically active region. Volcanic ash samples were collected from the Barstow Formation for isotopic dating using...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 June 1992
GSA Bulletin (1992) 104 (6): 644–658.
...DAVID P. WHISTLER; DOUGLAS W. BURBANK Abstract The Dove Spring Formation (DSF) is an 1,800-m-thick succession of fluvial, lacustrine, and volcanic rocks that contains a nearly continuous sequence of diverse vertebrate fossil assemblages. When the North American provincial mammalian ages were...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1982
AAPG Bulletin (1982) 66 (10): 1693.
... that are biostratigraphically useful. The Sucker Creek Formation (Barstovian-middle Miocene) can be characterized by the occurrence of Coscinodiscus(?) miocaenicus . The Poison Creek Formation of Barstovian(?)-Clarendonian age (middle to early late Miocene) contains Coscinodiscus(?) sp. cf. C. gorbunovii v. gorbunovii...
Journal Article
Published: 01 January 2012
Journal of Paleontology (2012) 86 (1): 177–190.
... recognized and this specimen may originate from Kansas or Nebraska and be early Miocene to late Pleistocene in age. Terrapene parornata is therefore the oldest demonstrable representative of crown group Terrapene (ca. 5.3–4.6 Ma). ‘Terrapene’ corneri from the late Barstovian of Nebraska and fragmentary...
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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 February 1992
GSA Bulletin (1992) 104 (2): 208–218.
... Gadsden County contains an early Barstovian land-mammal fauna, has 87 Sr/ 86 Sr age estimates between 14.7 ± 1.5 and 16.6 ± 1.0 Ma, is of reversed magnetic polarity, and probably correlates with Chron C5B-R. These results constrain the age of the Dogtown Member in the study area to between about 15.3...
Journal Article
Published: 01 August 1969
Canadian Journal of Earth Sciences (1969) 6 (4): 791–794.
...John E. Storer Abstract Neohipparion sp. from the Flaxville Gravel of Sheridan County, northern Montana, compares well with late Hemphillian species of Neohipparion in height of crown, shape of protocone, and development of pli caballin. A late Hemphillian age conflicts with the Barstovian...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1991
GSA Bulletin (1991) 103 (10): 1335–1345.
.... Sequence boundary delineation is further enhanced by reflection termination patterns, similar to those found in marine strata. Sequence age calibration is based upon vertebrate fossil and radiometric age data. Five sequences, separated by basin-wide unconformities, are recognized. Most sequence-bounding...
Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 October 1982
AAPG Bulletin (1982) 66 (10): 1694.
... terrigenous and volcaniclastic sediments that have been folded into a syncline and offset in a right-lateral sense by several northwest-trending faults. The fossil mammals from this formation are central to the concept of the middle Miocene “Barstovian” Land Mammal Age. During the fall of 1980, about 100...
Series: GSA Memoirs
Published: 01 January 1968
DOI: 10.1130/MEM116-p577
.... The oldest reliably dated rocks in the Esmeralda Formation are 13.1 m.y. by K-Ar (Barstovian), and all sedimentary strata are younger than an ash-flow sheet dated at 21.5 m.y. by K-Ar. An air-fall tuff in the upper part of the section has a K-Ar age of 4.3 m.y. Rocks of the Silver Peak volcanic center, 4.8...
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 2010
Journal of Paleontology (2010) 84 (2): 288–298.
..., and California), the presence of “ C .” occidentale indicates an interval of uncertain duration within the early Hemingfordian (He1) to early Barstovian (Ba 1) land mammal ages (early to middle Miocene) for the Centenario Fauna, between about 19 and 14.8 million years ago. Based on what is known of the modern...
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Journal Article
Journal: AAPG Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1944
AAPG Bulletin (1944) 28 (7): 977–1011.
... vertebrates appear to be related in part to the marine forms on the east and west coasts. Also, they are related to certain western continental faunas which are considered as upper Miocene. This evidence points to an upper Miocene or Barstovian age for the Burkeville material. It is less advanced than...
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Journal Article
Published: 18 September 2017
Journal of Paleontology (2018) 92 (2): 289–304.
...Jonathan J. Calede; Winifred A. Kehl; Edward B. Davis Abstract The Leptarctinae are an enigmatic subfamily of mustelids present in North America and Eurasia during the Miocene (Arikareean to Hemphillian North American Land Mammal Ages). Their diet and ecology have been particularly controversial...
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