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Ansei earthquake 1854

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Series: GSA Special Papers
Published: 15 August 2018
DOI: 10.1130/2018.2534(05)
EISBN: 9780813795348
... and propagates beyond this boundary, the entire megathrust breaks, as in the 1707 Hoei earthquake. When the rupture does not propagate beyond this portion, the rupture area is segmented, as in the 1854 Ansei, 1944 Tonankai, and 1946 Nankai earthquakes. In this case, the boundary works as a barrier. The asperity...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 1979
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (1979) 69 (5): 1343-1378.
... . Hatori T. (1976) . Documents of tsunami and crustal deformation in the Tokai district associated with the Ansei earthquake of Dec 23, 1854 (in Japanese) , Bull. Earthquake Res. Inst., Tokyo Univ. 51 , 13 - 28 . Hatori T. (1978) . Tsunami source of the Izu-Oshima-Kinkai...
Journal Article
Published: 19 May 2015
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2015) 105 (3): 1594-1605.
... w  8.1) and 1946 Nankai ( M w  8.4) earthquakes ruptured the eastern and western segments, respectively. The 1854 Ansei events also showed a similar signature, but the rupture of the eastern segment extended to the Tokai segment, which is considered to be less active compared to other segments...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 October 2006
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (2006) 96 (5): 1569-1596.
... all agree that rupture did not extend into Suruga Bay (segment E in Fig. 1 ) as happened during the great Tonankai (Ansei Tokai) earthquake of 1854, which also ruptured segments C and D. Segments A and B broke 32 hours after the first event of 1854 in the Ansei II (Ansei Nankaido) earthquake ( Ando...
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Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2018
DOI: 10.1144/SP456.1
EISBN: 9781786203373
... ( Loveless & Meade 2010 ) ( Fig. 1 ). The accumulated strain is released periodically during major subduction earthquakes. Since 1700, five M8+ earthquakes occurred ( Ando 1975 ). The most recent ones were the 1944 M w 8.1 Tonankai earthquake and the 1946 M w 8.4 Nankai earthquake. In 1854, large dual...
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Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.1144/GSL.SP.2007.273.01.07
EISBN: 9781862395213
... to Cascadia imagery, and we explore this, particularly through the example of 1855 Ansei earthquake, which was followed for a few months by a brief but abundant output of ‘namazu-e’ (catfish picture – prints) that combined earlier earthquake folklore with incisive observations on both earthquake effects...
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Book Chapter

Author(s)
Shinji Toda
Series: Geological Society, London, Geology of Series
Published: 01 January 2016
DOI: 10.1144/GOJ.14
EISBN: 9781862397064
... Nankai earthquakes. It is interesting to note that the time gap between the 1854 Ansei-Tokai ( M = 8.3) and 1854 Ansei-Nankai ( M = 8.3) events was only 32 hours. A significant difference between the 1944 Tonankai and 1854 Ansei-Tokai earthquake was the involvement of rupture of segment E in Figure...
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