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Amebelodon

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Journal Article
Published: 01 November 1990
Journal of Paleontology (1990) 64 (6): 1032–1040.
Journal Article
Published: 01 May 1944
Journal of Paleontology (1944) 18 (3): 271–274.
Journal Article
Published: 01 March 2006
Journal of Paleontology (2006) 80 (2): 357–366.
... ; Lambert, 1996 ). Their highest level of diversity was from the late Barstovian to the early Hemphillian, during which time six genera were recorded: Gomphotherium Burmeister, 1837 ; Rhynchotherium Falconer, 1868 [in Central America; see Webb and Perrigo (1984) ]; Amebelodon Barbour, 1927...
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Journal Article
Published: 01 September 2001
Journal of Paleontology (2001) 75 (5): 1043–1046.
... a Leptarctus. A subtropical climate for this region during the Hemphillian is suggested by the presence of large tortoises, rhinoceroses ( Aphelops and Teleoceras ), and the shovel-tusked mastodon, Amebelodon ( Schultz, 1977 ). The following abbreviations are used here: AMNH, American Museum...
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Journal Article
Journal: PALAIOS
Published: 01 June 2001
PALAIOS (2001) 16 (3): 279–293.
... have published carbon-isotope measurements for late Miocene proboscideans from North America. MacFadden and Cerling (1996) analyzed six specimens of the genus Amebelodon as part of a broader study examining changes in mammalian communities in Florida during the Neogene. Specimens from localities...
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Journal Article
Published: 28 November 2016
Journal of Paleontology (2017) 91 (1): 179–193.
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Journal Article
Journal: Geosphere
Published: 01 December 2008
Geosphere (2008) 4 (6): 976–991.
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Series: Geological Society, London, Special Publications
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.1144/GSL.SP.2007.273.01.19
EISBN: 9781862395213
... and Amebelodon , rhinoceros and camel species, and giant sloths continually erode out of mounds along river drainages. Wonderful Bone Creek demonstrates that such remains commanded the attention of the Pawnees at an early date. Pawnee medicine men undertook vision quests at nahurac (‘spirit animal’) mounds...
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