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Amargosa-Black Mountains Fault

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Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1993
GSA Bulletin (1993) 105 (9): 1190-1213.
... and 4.9 Ma between the Sperry Hills basin and the location of Amargosa Chaos basin in the southern Black Mountains. Continued, post-4.9 Ma, northwest- directed extension is required between the Amargosa Chaos basin and the southern Panamint Mountains. In addition, 15 km of right-lateral slip...
Series: GSA Memoirs
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.1130/MEM176-p363
... an azimuth of N55° ± 3 °W. This extension was dominantly accommodated by movement on the Amargosa fault system and late Neogene faults exposed along the western front of the Black Mountains. These data constrain the extension rate between the Black and Panamint Mountains to be between 6.4 and 2.7 mm/yr over...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 December 1959
GSA Bulletin (1959) 70 (12): 1497-1508.
... Amargosa thrusting; (3) uplift and erosion of Paleozoic strata and the Amargosa thrust fault, down to the folded Precambrian rocks in the Black Mountains block; (4) Middle (?) Tertiary rhyolite extrusions and the accumulation of later Tertiary fan and playa deposits; (5) Pliocene or Pleistocene uplift...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 July 1941
GSA Bulletin (1941) 52 (7): 941-999.
...LEVI F. NOBLE AbstractA flat thrust fault of middle or later Tertiary age, believed to have followed roughly the contact of later pre-Cambrian sediments with earlier pre-Cambrian metamorphic rocks, is well exposed throughout the Virgin Spring area, about 10 miles square, in the Black Mountains...
Journal Article
Journal: Lithosphere
Published: 01 August 2015
Lithosphere (2015) 7 (4): 473-480.
... is host to the AmargosaBlack Mountains detachment, a normal fault system that exposes 1.7 Ga gneiss and late Precambrian metasedimentary rocks intruded by the 11.6 Ma Willow Springs pluton ( Asmerom et al., 1994 ) and 10.4 Ma Smith Mountain Granite ( Miller et al., 2004 ). Published 40 Ar/ 39 Ar...
FIGURES | View All (5)
Series: GSA Memoirs
Published: 01 January 1990
DOI: 10.1130/MEM176-p377
...-drag flexure induced by movement on the west-dipping Amargosa fault system (late Miocene?), which is exposed in the Black Mountains to the east of Death Valley and is inferred to dip beneath the Panamint Mountains. The low-angle Emigrant detachment (late Miocene to early Pliocene) incised...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 September 1970
GSA Bulletin (1970) 81 (9): 2807-2816.
... of the region outlined by previous authors. Upper and lower age limits are established for the Furnace Creek Formation, requiring a minimum depositional rate of 127 cm/1000 yr at the north end of the Black Mountains. A denudation rate in excess of 50 cm/1000 yr is suggested for at least part of the Death Valley...
Journal Article
Journal: Lithosphere
Published: 01 February 2016
Lithosphere (2016) 8 (1): 3-22.
...Kurt L. Frankel; Lewis A. Owen; James F. Dolan; Jeffrey R. Knott; Zachery M. Lifton; Robert C. Finkel; Thad Wasklewicz AbstractAlluvial fans displaced by normal faults of the Black Mountains fault zone at Badwater and Mormon Point in Death Valley were mapped, surveyed, and dated using optically...
FIGURES | View All (14)
Series: GSA Field Guide
Published: 01 January 2000
DOI: 10.1130/0-8137-0002-7.383
EISBN: 9780813756028
... at the base of a steep ridge of Paleozoic carbonate rock on the edge of the Amargosa Desert. The opening is a 7 m by 23 m collapse into a northeast-striking planar fissure in the Banded Mountain Member of the Cambrian Bonanza King Formation. The collapse lies between two northwest-striking faults ( Carr, 1988...
Journal Article
Published: 01 May 2014
Environmental and Engineering Geoscience (2014) 20 (2): 177-198.
...MARSHA F. SOHN; JEFFREY R. KNOTT; SHANNON A. MAHAN AbstractThe Death Valley Fault System (DVFS) is part of the southern Walker Lane–eastern California shear zone. The normal Black Mountains Fault Zone (BMFZ) and the right-lateral Southern Death Valley Fault Zone (SDVFZ) are two components...
FIGURES | View All (12)
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 January 2015
GSA Bulletin (2015) 127 (1-2): 227-249.
... dips, and strike roughly perpendicular to the Garlock fault. A quartzite–black slate bed (A on Fig. 11 ) matches a correlative bed in the eastern El Paso Mountains (A′ on Fig. 11 ). A meta-conglomerate layer (B on Fig. 11 ) matches a narrow zone of rocks in the eastern El Paso Mountains (B′ on Fig...
FIGURES | View All (14)
Series: GSA Memoirs
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.1130/2007.1199(03)
.... Thermoluminescence and U-series analyses were used to date the surficial materials involved in the Quaternary faulting events. The rate of erosional downcutting of bedrock on the ridge crests and hillslopes of Yucca Mountain, being of particular concern with respect to the potential for breaching of the proposed...
FIGURES | View All (19)
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 July 2004
GSA Bulletin (2004) 116 (7-8): 858-879.
... and Quaternary basin fill of Jackass Flats and the Amargosa Desert (Fig. 1) . Within this complex graben, Miocene volcanic rocks of Yucca Mountain and Crater Flat are preserved in several 1–4-km-wide, gently east-dipping fault blocks separated by north-striking left-oblique normal faults. These volcanic rocks...
FIGURES | View All (15)
Image
Oblique Google Earth image of Section 1 of the <b>Black</b> <b>Mountains</b> <b>Fault</b> Zone (...
Published: 01 May 2014
Figure 2. Oblique Google Earth image of Section 1 of the Black Mountains Fault Zone (BMFZ; view east from 5.6-km elevation; October 30, 2010 imagery date) showing both the eastern and western sections along with the locations of study Sites A, B, and C relative to the Amargosa River flood plain
Journal Article
Journal: Lithosphere
Published: 01 December 2016
Lithosphere (2016) 8 (6): 587-600.
... is nearly always developed in footwall rocks that are dioritic to granitic in composition. Mylonitic marbles that are locally present in the footwalls of the Black Mountains and that are intercalated with extensively chloritized gneisses are visually unaltered. The breccias contain a distinctive assemblage...
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 November 2007
GSA Bulletin (2007) 119 (11-12): 1337-1347.
... deposits and associated rock avalanches southwest of the northern trace of the Mesquite segment of the SFS at Black Butte are dextrally offset 30 ± 4 km from their source region, northeast of the fault at Devil Peak in the southern Spring Mountains (Fig. 1B) . Combined with previous estimates, this result...
FIGURES | View All (6)
Journal Article
Journal: Geosphere
Published: 01 April 2010
Geosphere (2010) 6 (2): 93-129.
... system ( Fig. 16 ). Such an alignment is consistent with the interpreted offset of Black Butte from a similar lithologic sequence in the southern Spring Mountains at Devil Peak, ∼30 km to the southeast ( Guest et al., 2007 ). This location is also consistent with the trace of known Quaternary faults...
FIGURES | View All (27)
Journal Article
Journal: GSA Bulletin
Published: 01 June 2000
GSA Bulletin (2000) 112 (6): 871-883.
... rocks and structures. One of the most controversial types of structure is the trio of turtlebacks exposed along the western side of the Black Mountains (Fig. 1) . The Death Valley turtlebacks are named for the large exhumed fault surfaces that make up a significant portion of the western Black Mountain...
FIGURES | View All (17)
Series: GSA Memoirs
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.1130/2007.1199(04)
...; E shows that slip on boundary condition faults provides for appropriate relief for Yucca Mountain. Boundary condition fault 1—inferred fault in Amargosa Valley; boundary condition fault 2—gravity fault. From Janssen and King (2000) . Figure 24. Tectonic model of Crater Flat basin from...
FIGURES | View All (32)
Series: GSA Memoirs
Published: 01 January 2007
DOI: 10.1130/2007.1199(02)
... in elevated crustal blocks and intervening deep, high-relief basins ( Blakely et al., 1999 ). Structural relief is large in places, because detachment faulting has unroofed some of the ranges, including the Funeral Mountains and Black Mountains ( Figs. 3A and 3B ). Distinctive...
FIGURES | View All (19)