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Human behavioral response in the 2019 Ridgecrest, California, earthquakes; assessing immediate actions based on data from "Did You Feel It?"

James D. Goltz, Hyejeong Park, Vincent Quitoriano and David J. Wald
Human behavioral response in the 2019 Ridgecrest, California, earthquakes; assessing immediate actions based on data from "Did You Feel It?"
Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (July 2020) 110 (4): 1589-1602

Abstract

Human behavioral response to earthquake ground motion has long been a subject of multidisciplinary interest and research. In most versions of seismic intensity scales, human perceptions and behavior are one component of the assignment of intensity. Public health research has shown that actions taken during earthquakes have a significant impact on the incidence of injury or the maintenance of safety. Based on this research, emergency managers and organizations promoting emergency preparedness have advocated strategies such as drop, cover, and hold on (DCHO) and promoted this safety measure through public education and annual drills. The "Did You Feel It?" (DYFI) mapping system (see Data and Resources) based on an online questionnaire developed and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey has provided opportunities for those who have experienced an earthquake to report this experience worldwide since 2004. The DYFI questionnaire, although designed to assign intensity, also contains questions regarding the behavior in which one has engaged during the earthquake. The questionnaire includes other important information that may elucidate behavioral response to earthquakes, including assigned intensity, emotional reaction, and whether damage occurred at the location where the earthquake was experienced. The very large number of people who completed DYFI questionnaires following the July 2019 Ridgecrest, California, earthquakes provides a robust dataset for analysis and suggests that as intensity and levels of fear increase, behavior becomes more active in terms of physical movement to locations of presumed safety. Among active responses including DCHO, going to a doorway, and running outside, DCHO was the least likely to be implemented. The study provides possible explanations for low participation in DCHO despite active campaigns to promote this strategy.


ISSN: 0037-1106
EISSN: 1943-3573
Coden: BSSAAP
Serial Title: Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America
Serial Volume: 110
Serial Issue: 4
Title: Human behavioral response in the 2019 Ridgecrest, California, earthquakes; assessing immediate actions based on data from "Did You Feel It?"
Affiliation: University of Colorado Boulder, Institute of Behavioral Science, Boulder, CO, United States
Pages: 1589-1602
Published: 20200707
Text Language: English
Publisher: Seismological Society of America, Berkeley, CA, United States
References: 52
Accession Number: 2020-067263
Categories: Environmental geologySeismology
Document Type: Serial
Bibliographic Level: Analytic
Illustration Description: illus. incl. sketch maps
N34°00'00" - N38°00'00", W120°00'00" - W115°00'00"
Secondary Affiliation: Kyoto University, JPN, JapanU. S. Geological Survey, USA, United States
Country of Publication: United States
Secondary Affiliation: GeoRef, Copyright 2020, American Geosciences Institute. Abstract, Copyright, Seismological Society of America. Reference includes data from GeoScienceWorld, Alexandria, VA, United States
Update Code: 202041
Program Name: USGSOPNon-USGS publications with USGS authors
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