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Sedimentology of the Lower Cretaceous reservoirs of the Sea Lion Field, North Falkland Basin

L. S. Williams
Sedimentology of the Lower Cretaceous reservoirs of the Sea Lion Field, North Falkland Basin (in The North Falkland Basin revisited; exploration and appraisal of the Sea Lion Field, L. S. Williams (editor), R. Newbould (editor) and J. R. Underhill (editor))
Petroleum Geoscience (June 2015) 21 (2-3): 183-198

Abstract

The Sea Lion Field in the North Falkland Basin was discovered in 2010 by Well 14/10-2, which tested oil from Lower Cretaceous sands of the Sea Lion fan complex. Appraisal of the field involved the drilling of a further eight wells from which an extensive wireline-log data set and 455 m of core were acquired. This unique data set has allowed detailed study of the reservoir sedimentology and has significantly benefited reservoir characterization. The reservoirs are interpreted to be deposited in a deep-water lacustrine basin as base-of-slope to basin-floor fans fed by canyons or channel-feeder systems from the east. Deposition is considered to have been affected both by turbidity currents and by liquefied sediment gravity flows, such that reservoir facies are dominated by those associated with high- and low-density turbidites, mass-flow deposits, and, to a lesser extent, hybrid-event beds. In the absence of significant chronostratigraphic control, the description of the first-order reservoir architecture is primarily driven by seismic interpretation, whilst the core affords significant control of the internal architecture of individual fans. Several lines of evidence point towards the Sea Lion sands being derived from a coexisting, shallow-water system on the eastern margin of the basin. Palaeogeographical reconstruction links this shoreface system to a large, contemporaneous, southerly-prograding delta via wave reworking and longshore drift of delta-front sands. Evolution of this delta has played a significant role in the timing, positioning and emplacement of fans along the eastern margin of the North Falkland Basin. The overall impact of the core data set has been to improve confidence in the reservoir characterization and spatial distribution of facies within the reservoir model, and to narrow significantly the range of uncertainty, which has direct implications for field development planning.


ISSN: 1354-0793
EISSN: 2041-496X
Serial Title: Petroleum Geoscience
Serial Volume: 21
Serial Issue: 2-3
Title: Sedimentology of the Lower Cretaceous reservoirs of the Sea Lion Field, North Falkland Basin
Title: The North Falkland Basin revisited; exploration and appraisal of the Sea Lion Field
Author(s): Williams, L. S.
Author(s): Williams, L. S.editor
Author(s): Newbould, R.editor
Author(s): Underhill, J. R.editor
Affiliation: Rockhopper Exploration, Salisbury, United Kingdom
Affiliation: Rockhopper Exploration, Salisbury, United Kingdom
Pages: 183-198
Published: 20150617
Text Language: English
Publisher: Geological Society Publishing House for EAGE (European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers), London, United Kingdom
References: 17
Accession Number: 2015-073856
Categories: Economic geology, geology of energy sourcesSedimentary petrology
Document Type: Serial
Bibliographic Level: Analytic
Illustration Description: illus. incl. sect., strat. col., geol. sketch maps
S50°00'00" - S49°00'00", W59°00'00" - E59°30'00"
Secondary Affiliation: Premier Oil Exploration and Production, GBR, United KingdomHeriot-Watt University, GBR, United Kingdom
Country of Publication: United Kingdom
Secondary Affiliation: GeoRef, Copyright 2017, American Geosciences Institute. Reference includes data from GeoScienceWorld, Alexandria, VA, United States. Reference includes data from The Geological Society, London, London, United Kingdom
Update Code: 201532
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