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GEOREF RECORD

Emergent Pliocene and Pleistocene sediments of southeastern Georgia; an anomalous, fossil-poor, clastic section

Helaine W. Markewich, Charles M. Hacke and Paul F. Huddlestun
Emergent Pliocene and Pleistocene sediments of southeastern Georgia; an anomalous, fossil-poor, clastic section (in Quaternary coasts of the United States; marine and lacustrine systems, Charles H. Fletcher (editor) and John F. Wehmiller (editor))
Special Publication - Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists (December 1992) 48: 173-189

Abstract

The surface and near-surface geology of the Atlantic Coastal Plain from Cape Fear, North Carolina to Cape Canaveral, Florida, below 76 m (250 ft) in altitude, comprises Pliocene and Pleistocene fluvial marine, back-barrier, barrier, and shallow-shelf sand, silt, and clay. The fossil content of age-equivalent Pliocene and Pleistocene sediments decreases from the Cape Fear area southward into Georgia. In the Carolinas, fossils are common. Paleontological analyses and isotopic and chemical age determinations, combined with lithostratigraphic studies and geologic mapping, have resulted in the establishment of a regional time-stratigraphic framework. In Georgia, fossils are scarce. Most known fossil localities are in early late Pliocene sediments paleontologically dated between 3.5 and 2.8 Ma. Microfossil data suggest the presence of at least two other Pliocene units-late early Pliocene (4.2-4.0 Ma) and latest late Pliocene (2.4-1.8 Ma). Fossil data are insufficient to differentiate Pleistocene units, but there are distinctive changes in shell morphology and species abundance of foraminifera in sediments topographically above and topographically below 9 m (30 ft) in altitude. No isotopic or paleomagnetic data are available for Pliocene or Pleistocene sediments in Georgia. There has been no detailed geologic mapping. Regional mapping dates to the turn of the century. The fossil-poor nature of both onshore and offshore Pliocene and Pleistocene Coastal Plain sediments in the Georgia part of the Atlantic Coastal Plain may be due to any one or combination of the following: styles and rates of regional and/or local uplift; sediment load of the numerous rivers that drain this region; freshwater influence on estuarine and nearshore littoral environments; shoreline configuration relative to major ocean currents; dissolution as the result of weathering, and erosion.


ISSN: 0097-3270
Coden: SPMIAF
Serial Title: Special Publication - Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists
Serial Volume: 48
Title: Emergent Pliocene and Pleistocene sediments of southeastern Georgia; an anomalous, fossil-poor, clastic section
Title: Quaternary coasts of the United States; marine and lacustrine systems
Author(s): Markewich, Helaine W.Hacke, Charles M.Huddlestun, Paul F.
Author(s): Fletcher, Charles H., IIIeditor
Author(s): Wehmiller, John F.editor
Affiliation: U. S. Geological Survey, Doraville, GA, United States
Affiliation: University of Hawaii, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Honolulu, HI, United States
Pages: 173-189
Published: 199212
Text Language: English
Publisher: Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists, Tulsa, OK, United States
References: 79
Accession Number: 2013-063699
Categories: Stratigraphy
Document Type: Serial
Bibliographic Level: Analytic
Annotation: IGCP Project No. 274
Illustration Description: illus. incl. geol. sketch map, strat. col.
N30°19'60" - N35°00'00", W85°34'60" - W80°45'00"
Secondary Affiliation: University of Delaware, USA, United StatesGeorgia Geologic Survey, USA, United States
Country of Publication: United States
Secondary Affiliation: GeoRef, Copyright 2018, American Geosciences Institute.
Update Code: 201339
Program Name: USGSOPNon-USGS publications with USGS authors
Program Name: IGCPInternational Geological Correlation Programme
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