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Paleogeographic significance of Ediacaran cyclomedusoids within the Antelope Mountain Quartzite, Yreka Subterrane, eastern Klamath Mountains, California

Nancy Lindsley-Griffin, John R. Griffin and Jack D. Farmer
Paleogeographic significance of Ediacaran cyclomedusoids within the Antelope Mountain Quartzite, Yreka Subterrane, eastern Klamath Mountains, California (in The terrane puzzle; new perspectives on paleontology and stratigraphy from the North American Cordillera, Robert B. Blodgett (editor) and George D. Stanley (editor))
Special Paper - Geological Society of America (2008) 442: 1-37

Abstract

Newly recognized cyclomedusoid fossils in the Antelope Mountain Quartzite confirm that it is latest Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran) in age. Biogeographic affinities of the cyclomedusoid fossils suggest that the Yreka subterrane and its close associate, the Trinity subterrane, formed after the breakup of Rodinia in an ocean basin bordering Australia, northern Canada, Siberia, and Baltica. Reevaluating biogeographic, geological, and paleomagnetic evidence in the context of this starting point, the Yreka subterrane and Trinity subterrane may have been located at either 7 degrees /N or 7 degrees /S latitude ca. 580-570 Ma, but were not necessarily close to Laurentia. Continental detrital zircons (3.2-1.3 Ga) in the Antelope Mountain Quartzite most likely came from Australia or Siberia rather than Laurentia. The Yreka subterrane and Trinity subterrane record approximately 180 m.y. of active margin events somewhere in Panthalassa (Proto-Pacific Ocean). Paleozoic biogeographic data, paleomagnetism, and regional relationships indicate that Yreka subterrane and Trinity subterrane were located throughout the early Paleozoic in the part of Panthalassa surrounded by Australia, NW Laurentia, Siberia, China, Baltica, and the Uralian terranes. By the mid-Devonian they were located at 31 degrees /N or 31 degrees /S in a somewhat isolated location, probably in a Northern Hemisphere oceanic plateau or island chain well outboard of other tectonic elements, and by the Permian they were almost completely isolated from other tectonic elements. The Yreka subterrane, as part of the Klamath superterrane, was not native to North America and did not accrete to it until the Early Cretaceous.


ISSN: 0072-1077
EISSN: 2331-219X
Coden: GSAPAZ
Serial Title: Special Paper - Geological Society of America
Serial Volume: 442
Title: Paleogeographic significance of Ediacaran cyclomedusoids within the Antelope Mountain Quartzite, Yreka Subterrane, eastern Klamath Mountains, California
Title: The terrane puzzle; new perspectives on paleontology and stratigraphy from the North American Cordillera
Author(s): Lindsley-Griffin, NancyGriffin, John R.Farmer, Jack D.
Author(s): Blodgett, Robert B.editor
Author(s): Stanley, George D., Jr.editor
Affiliation: University of Nebraska, Department of Geosciences, Lincoln, NE, United States
Affiliation: U. S. Geological Survey, Anchorage, AK, United States
Pages: 1-37
Published: 2008
Text Language: English
Publisher: Geological Society of America (GSA), Boulder, CO, United States
References: 187
Accession Number: 2009-006313
Categories: Stratigraphy
Document Type: Serial
Bibliographic Level: Analytic
Illustration Description: illus. incl. 5 tables, geol. sketch map
N41°30'00" - N41°45'00", W122°55'00" - W122°30'00"
Secondary Affiliation: University of Montana, USA, United StatesArizona State University, USA, United States
Country of Publication: United States
Secondary Affiliation: GeoRef, Copyright 2017, American Geosciences Institute.
Update Code: 200904
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