In recent years, fiber-optic distributed acoustic sensing (DAS) has experienced a rapid surge in popularity within the geophysics community. When compared to traditional point sensors, DAS offers several significant advantages. First, DAS provides spatially and temporally continuous measurements at high resolution along distances of more than 100 km. Its broad frequency response allows it to capture strain changes induced by seismic waves at hundreds of hertz and changes from fracture propagation and reservoir deformation at submegahertz frequencies. The absence of electromechanical components means that DAS cables can withstand harsh environments, facilitating long-term monitoring with minimal maintenance. Furthermore, DAS offers the...

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