There has been explosive growth in near-surface electromagnetic (EM) induction geophysics in the past several years (Everett, 2012). New and experienced practitioners are achieving great success in applying the method to an increasing variety of problems. Moreover, theorists are becoming better able to exploit the rich information content that is available in electromagnetic induction data sets.

The EM induction method, with its broad opportunities to design new transmitters, receivers, and interpretation tools, continues to offer wide avenues to capture the spatial complexity of the subsurface. This special Geophysics issue brings forward the latest achievements, which should stimulate...

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