Abstract

The Central Indian Tectonic Zone demarcates the zone of amalgamation between the North Indian Craton and the South Indian Craton. Presently, the major controversies in the existing tectonic models of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone revolve around the direction of subduction and the precise timing of accretion between the North Indian Craton and the South Indian Craton. A new model for the tectonic evolution of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone is postulated in this contribution, based on recent geological and geophysical evidence, combined with previously documented tectonic configurations. The present study employs the slab break-off hypothesis and subsequent polarity reversal to explain the tectonic processes involved in the evolution of the Central Indian Tectonic Zone. We propose that the subduction initiated (c. 2.5 Ga) in a S-directed system producing island-arc sequences on the South Indian Craton. The southward subduction regime culminated with slab break-off underneath the South Indian Craton between c. 1.65 Ga and 1.55 Ga, which subsequently induced subduction polarity reversal and set the course for N-directed subduction (<1.55 Ga). The final closure along the Central Indian Tectonic Zone is governed by the collisional regime during the Sausar Orogeny (1.0–0.9 Ga).

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