For many people, sauropods are ‘archetypal’ dinosaurs: the long necks, massive bodies and preposterously small heads of Diplodocus and its kin are instantly recognizable. For most of the twentieth century sauropods were in a palaeontological backwater, with only a handful of specialists working on these behemoths. Most of the published papers were strictly taxonomic in outlook with occasional (usually speculative) nods towards palaeobiology. However, it appears that their time has come at last, as the past 15 years have witnessed a revolution in our understanding of these animals. Many new sauropod genera have been described, from all regions of the...

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