This book starts with a quote from the late Derek Ager: ‘ . . . bangs have replaced whimpers and the geological record has become much more exciting that it was thought to be.’ Certainly, one of the big ‘bangs’ of the latter part of the Phanerozoic was the Chesapeake Bay impact, about 35 million years ago. Much has been published in scientific papers about Chesapeake Bay and its effects, starting during the early 1980s when deep-sea cores bearing a few centimetres of the crater’s ejecta were recovered by the Glomar Challenger off Atlantic City, New Jersey. Subsequent drilling onshore...

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