Abstract

Quartz in deformed rocks from two large, high-grade shear zones around the Morin anorthosite (Morin terrane, Grenville Province) displays distinctive microstructures, as well as c-axis preferred orientations. In the west-dipping Morin shear zone, east of the Morin anorthosite, four distinct quartz microstructures (types 1–4) are identified, based on deformation features and grain size. The c-axis orientations are characterized by a single maximum near the stretching lineation and two maxima in type 1 microstructure, and by an asymmetrical, single girdle in type 2 microstructure. Quartz c axes show crossed-girdle pattern in type 3 microstructure. Both quartz microstructures and c-axis preferred orientations suggest that crystal–plastic slip and dynamic recrystallization are the dominant deformation mechanisms. The asymmetry of c-axis orientations with respect to the mylonitic foliation, as well as the substructures developed in quartz, indicates a dextral sense of shear in the Morin shear zone. Type 4 microstructure, which developed in some gneisses and granulites, is interpreted to record influence of postdeformation annealing by which quartz c-axis orientations were partially modified. In the north-northeast-trending, subvertical Labelle shear zone that separates the Morin terrane from the Mont-Laurier terrane, metamorphic assemblages and structural elements suggest that an early, sinistral strike-slip deformation occurred under granulite-facies conditions. This was overprinted by a late downdip movement of the Mont-Laurier terrane under retrogressive conditions. Quartz in felsic gneisses from this zone shows two types of microstructures: one is similar to type 4 from the Morin shear zone, the other is named type 5. Quartz c-axis orientations are complex and less systematic, due to overprinting by two episodes of deformation and possible annealing. These complexities limit the utility of quartz microstructures and c-axis data in the structural analysis of the Labelle shear zone.

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