Abstract

Organic minerals are natural organic compounds with both a well-defined chemical composition and crystallographic properties; their occurrences reveal traces of the high concentration of certain organic compounds in natural environments. Thus the origin and process of formation of organic minerals will lead us to understand the fate and behavior of the organic molecules in the lithosphere. With the aim of their contribution to new developments in mineralogy, we subdivide organic minerals into two groups: (1) ionic organic minerals, in which organic anions and various cations are held together by ionic bonds, and (2) molecular organic minerals, in which electroneutral organic molecules are bonded by weak intermolecular interactions. This review is composed of four sections. The first section is concerned with the definition of both organic minerals and the above two groups. The second deals with crystal chemistry and geochemistry of oxalate minerals, which are the most typical ionic organic minerals. In this section, the role of (H2O)0 is first discussed, as most oxalate minerals incorporate (H2O)0 into their crystal structures. Then the phase relationships among hydrous and anhydrous calcium oxalate minerals, namely their structural hierarchy, are described, owing to the fact that they are the most abundant ionic organic minerals. In addition, the weak Jahn– Teller effect of the Fe2+ ion is exemplified in humboldtine [Fe2+(C2O4)·2H2O]. The Fe2+ ion causes distortions of octahedra in this organic mineral, though the effect has hardly been observed in inorganic minerals. In the third section, we describe the crystal chemistry and process of formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) minerals, which are the most typical molecular organic minerals. Those of karpatite (C24H12) and idrialite (C22H14) are particularly considered in detail. In the fourth section, we summarize the characteristics of organic minerals and discuss their contribution to Earth and planetary sciences.

Abstract

Les minéraux organiques sont des composés organiques naturels ayant à la fois une composition chimique et des propriétés cristallographiques bien définies. Leurs présence témoigne de la concentration élevée de certains composés organiques dans les milieux naturels. Donc, l’origine et les processus de formation des minéraux organiques nous permettront de comprendre le sort et le comportement de molécules organiques dans la lithosphère. Dans le but de contribuer à l’essor de nouveaux développements en minéralogie, nous divisons les minéraux organiques en deux groupes: (1) minéraux organiques ioniques, dans lesquels les anions organiques et divers cations sont liés par des liaisons ioniques, et (2) minéraux organiques moléculaires, dans lesquels les molécules organiques électroneutres sont liées les unes aux autres par de faibles interactions intermoléculaires. Cette vue d’ensemble comprend quatre thèmes principaux. La première section porte sur la définition générale des minéraux organiques et des deux groupes nommés ci-haut. La deuxième porte sur la cristallochimie et la géochimie des oxalates, les minéraux organiques ioniques les plus typiques. Nous discutons d’abord du rôle de (H2O)0, parce que la plupart des minéraux de ce groupe incorporent (H2O)0 dans leurs structures cristallines. Ensuite, nous décrivons les relations de phases parmi les minéraux oxalatés de calcium, hydratés et anhydres, et en particulier leur hiérarchie structurale, ces composés étant les minéraux organiques ioniques les plus abondants. De plus, nous décrivons à titre d’exemple le faible effet de Jahn–Teller causé par l’ion Fe2+ dans la humboldtine, [Fe2+(C2O4)·2H2O]. L’ion Fe2+ cause une distorsion des octaèdres de ce minéral organique, quoique l’effet est à peine décelé dans les minéraux inorganiques. Le troisième thème traite de la cristallochimie et du processus de formation de minéraux hydrocarburés polycycliques aromatiques (PAH), qui sont les plus typiques de la classe de minéraux organiques moléculaires. En particulier, nous examinons le cas de la karpatite (C24H12) et de l’idrialite (C22H14). Nous terminons avec un résumé des caractéristiques des minéraux organiques et une discussion de leur contribution aux sciences de la Terre et des planètes.

(Traduit par la Rédaction)

You do not currently have access to this article.