Abstract

Indium minerals and In-rich phases in Brazil are restricted to Paleo- to Mesoproterozoic tin-bearing within-plate magmatic zones in central Brazil. The most important concentration of indium is in the Mangabeira granitic massif, which is also the type locality of yanomamite (InAsO4·2H2O). The Sn–In-mineralized area of this massif is comprised of Li-rich siderophyllite granite, topaz–albite granite, quartz – Li-mica greisens and a vein of In-rich quartz–topaz rock, with up to 1 wt% In, mainly composed of quartz, topaz, zinnwaldite, arsenopyrite and cassiterite. Accessory minerals are sphalerite, ferberite, löllingite, chalcopyrite, bismuthinite, galena, stannite-group minerals, tennantite, argentite and roquesite. Secondary minerals comprise bornite, digenite, covellite, scorodite, phenakite, native copper, yanomamite, dzhalindite, metazeunerite and rare arsenates, like pharmacosiderite, segnitite, chenevixite, and goudeyite, and unknown Bi, Ba and Sn arsenates. Indium-rich stannite, as well as red In-rich and brown In-poor varieties of sphalerite, also are present. Zinc is replaced by indium, copper and iron in the sphalerite structure, probably according to the scheme Cu + In + Fe = 3Zn. Indium-rich sphalerite intergrown with roquesite, forming a texture interpreted as the product of roquesite exsolution, is documented here for the first time. The data obtained are consistent with the existence of the pseudoternary system stannite – sphalerite – roquesite and of a discontinuous solid-solution between yanomamite and scorodite.

Abstract

Au Brésil, les minéraux d’indium ou riches en indium sont limités aux complexes stannifères paléozoïques ou mésoprotérozoïques de type intra-plaques dans le centre du pays. La concentration la plus importante en indium se trouve dans le granite de Mangabeira, la localité-type de la yanomamite (InAsO4·2H2O). La portion de ce massif minéralisée en Sn–In est peuplée de granite lithinifère à sidérophyllite, granite à topaze–albite, des greisens à quartz – mica lithinifère, et une veine de roche à quartz–topaze contenant jusqu’à 1% In (poids) dans un assemblage de quartz, topaze, zinnwaldite, arsenopyrite et cassitérite. Les minéraux accessoires sont sphalérite, ferberite, löllingite, chalcopyrite, bismuthinite, galène, membres du groupe de la stannite, tennantite, argentite et roquesite. Parmi les minéraux secondaires, notons la bornite, digénite, covellite, scorodite, phénakite, cuivre natif, yanomamite, dzhalindite, métazeunerite, et des arsenates plutôt rares, par exemple pharmacosidérite, segnitite, chenevixite, et goudeyite, ainsi que des arsenates méconnus de Bi, Ba et Sn. La stannite riche en In, ainsi que des variétés de sphalérite rouge, riche en In, et brune, à faible teneur en In, sont aussi présentes. Dans la sphalérite, le zinc est remplacé par l’indium, le cuivre et le fer selon le schéma Cu + In + Fe = 3Zn. La sphalérite peut se présenter en intercroissance avec la roquesite, dans une texture décrite ici pour la première fois et attribuée à l’exsolution. Nos données concordent avec l’hypothèse qu’il existe un système pseudoternaire stannite – sphalérite – roquesite et une solution solide discontinue entre yanomamite et scorodite.

(Traduit par la Rédaction)

You do not currently have access to this article.