Abstract

The coordination chemistry of molybdenum was investigated in nine series of synthetic silicate glasses, including sodium disilicate (NS2), sodium trisilicate (NS3), albite (Ab), anorthite (An), Ab50An50, Ab30An70, diopside (DI), rhyolite (RH), and basalt (BA), using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopies. The Mo content of these glasses ranges from 300 ppm to 3 wt.%. On the basis of results derived from high-resolution X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, molybdenum is present primarily as molybdate moieties [Mo(VI)O42−] in most of the glass compositions prepared at f(O2) values ranging from 1 atm to 10−12 atm (temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1700°C, i.e., from air to IW+4). Analysis of extended XAFS (EXAFS) spectra of these glasses indicates an average Mo–O distance of ~1.76(1) Å. No evidence for second-neighbor Si or Al around Mo was found in any of the glasses, confirming that molybdate moieties are not connected to the tetrahedral framework, in agreement with Pauling bond-valence predictions. The presence of molybdate moieties in regions of these glasses enriched in network modifiers helps explain why crystalline molybdates can nucleate easily in silicate glasses (and, by extension, in the corresponding melts). In the highly polymerized glass compositions (such as “Ab” or “RH”), Mo(VI)O66− moieties also exist, but at minor levels (<20% of the total Mo). In glasses prepared at low f(O2) (near IW), reduced species of Mo occur, such as molybdenyl [Mo(V) and Mo(IV)]. In glasses prepared at even lower f(O2) (near IW+4), Mo is present as a metallic precipitate. The prevalence of molybdate moieties in silicate glasses until relatively low oxygen fugacities (IW) are achieved appears to be at variance with the fact that molybdenite, Mo(IV)S2, is the dominant Mo-bearing mineral in the Earth’s crust. In a companion paper, we re-examine the speciation of molybdenum in more complex systems that are closer to geochemical reality, such as high-temperature melts, densified (high-pressure) glasses, and silicate glass compositions enriched in volatiles.

Abstract

La spéciation du Mo a été étudiée dans neuf series de verres silicatés synthétiques: sodium di- et trisilicate (NS2, NS3), albite (Ab), anorthite (An), Ab50An50, Ab30An70, diopside (DI), rhyolite (RH) et basalte (BA), avec les spectroscopies RPE (paramagnétique électronique) et XAFS (d’absorption X). La teneur en Mo des verres varie entre 300 ppm et 3% (poids). Le XANES haute résolution indique que Mo est présent sous forme d’unités molybdates [Mo(VI)O42−] dans la majorité des verres préparés à des f(O2) comprises entre 1 atm et 10−12 atm. L’ EXAFS indique des distances Mo–O de ~1.76(1) Å. Aucun second voisin Si ou Al n’a été détecté autour du Mo, confirmant que les unités molybdate sont déconnectées du réseau tétraédrique, en accord avec les prédictions de force de liaison de Pauling. Dans des compositions très polymérisées (comme “Ab” et “RH”), les entités Mo(VI)O66− sont aussi détectées, mais à moins de 20% du molybdène total. La présence des unités molybdate dans ces verres explique pourquoi les molybdates cristallins nucléent facilement depuis ces compositions. Pour des verres préparés aux basses f(O2) (tampon IW), des états redox réduits du Mo sont détectés, comme Mo(V) et Mo(IV). Dans les verres synthétisés à encore plus basse f(O2) (IW–3), le molybdène précipite sous forme micro métallique. Cependant, la prévalence des unités molybdates dans des verres assez réduits (IW) semblent être en contradiction avec la géochimie du molybdène dans la croûte terrestre, où se forme plutôt de la molybdénite, Mo(IV)S2. Dans un travail connexe, nous examinons la spéciation du molybdène en conditions plus proches de la réalité géochimique, par exemple en conditions in situ (magmas à haute température et verres densifiés) et enrichis en fluides (H2O, halogènes et soufre).

You do not currently have access to this article.