Abstract

The mineralogy, composition and texture of magmatic silicates, alteration minerals, base-metal sulfides (BMS) and platinum-group minerals (PGM) were determined for seven borehole samples from the J–M Reef and its footwall in the Stillwater Complex, Montana. We used optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron-microprobe analysis. The BMS identified are pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite and minor pyrite. Thirty-six grains of PGM were found in four of six polished thin sections. The samples record evidence of a hydrothermal event or events that have locally altered magmatic silicates, recrystallized BMS aggregates and remobilized sulfides and platinum-group elements (PGE). The alteration assemblage consists dominantly of chlorite, clinozoisite, serpentine, calcite, talc, white mica, and magnetite, with traces of tremolite, Cl-rich ferropargasite and quartz. The intensity of alteration ranges from 90% altered in the footwall sample to 10% altered in the least-altered reef sample. In the weakly altered samples of the reef, BMS occur in aggregates interstitial to essentially unaltered plagioclase and are probably of primary origin. Some of these aggregates contain inclusions of PGM from 80 to 130 μm across at the BMS–silicate contact. In strongly altered samples, the BMS are strongly recrystallized and intergrown with hydrous minerals in aggregates; they also replace primary silicates and appear in veinlets up to 2 mm wide. The PGM in this association occur with or without BMS as fine grains (1–30 μm) intergrown with alteration minerals in replacements of silicates and in veinlets. The intergrowth of secondary sulfides with chlorite, clinozoisite, and Cl-rich ferropargasite indicates an alteration assemblage that probably formed between 230 to over 350°C. Hydrothermal alteration and mineralization are associated with thin dilational fractures that provided channelways for hydrothermal fluids. As the assay data for the four borehole cores indicate, there is an inverse relationship between intensity of hydrothermal alteration and PGE grade that could explain some of the variability in the grade and thickness of the J–M Reef.

Abstract

Nous avons établi la minéralogie, la composition et la texture des silicates magmatiques, des minéraux d’altération, des sulfures des métaux de base (BMS) et des minéraux du groupe du platine dans sept échantillons provenant de carottes traversant le banc dit de J–M et les roches du socle du complexe de Stillwater, au Montana. A cette fin, nous avons utilisé la microscopie optique, la microscopie électronique à balayage et les analyses à la microsonde électronique. Les sulfures des métaux de base sont: pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, pentlandite et pyrite accessoire. Trente-six grains de minéraux du groupe du platine sont présents dans quatre des six lames minces polies. Les échantillons témoignent d’un ou des événements d’altération qui ont causé une altération des silicates primaires, recristallisé les aggrégats de sulfures, et remobilisé les éléments du groupe du platine. L’assemblage indicatif de l’altération contient surtout chlorite, clinozoïsite, serpentine, calcite, talc, mica blanc, et magnétite, avec des traces de trémolite, ferropargasite riche en chlore et quartz. L’intensité de l’altération varie de 90% dans un échantillon des roches sous-jacentes à 10% dans l’échantillon du banc J–M le plus sain. Dans les échantillons légèrement altérés du banc, les sulfures se trouvent en aggrégats interstitiels à des cristaux frais de plagioclase, et seraient probablement d’origine primaire. Certains de ces aggrégats contiennent des inclusions de minéraux du groupe du platine de 80 à 130 μm de diamètre aux contacts entre sulfures et silicates. Dans les échantillons plus altérés, les sulfures sont fortement recristallisés et en intercroissances avec les minéraux d’altération; ils remplacent aussi les silicates primaires et forment des veinules atteignant 2 mm en largeur. Les minéraux du groupe du platine dans cette association se présentent en grains plus fins (1–30 μm) associés ou non avec les sulfures, en intercroissances avec les minéraux d’altération en remplacement des silicates, et dans les veinules. L’intercroissance de sulfures secondaires avec la chlorite, clinozoïsite, et ferropargasite chlorée indiquerait une recristallisation probablement entre 230 et plus de 350°C. L’altération hydrothermale et la minéralisation sont associées à de fines fractures dilationnelles qui auraient fourni des avenues d’accès à la phase fluide hydrothermale. Comme l’indiquent les données analytiques, il y a une corrélation inverse entre intensité de l’activité hydrothermale et la teneur en éléments du groupe du platine, ce qui rendrait compte de la variabilité en teneur et épaisseur du banc J–M.

(Traduit par la Rédaction)

You do not currently have access to this article.