Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Raman spectroscopy: Analytical perspectives in mineralogical research

By
Lutz Nasdala
Lutz Nasdala
1
Institut für Geowissenschaften – Mineralogie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, D-55099 Mainz, Germany
Search for other works by this author on:
David C. Smith
David C. Smith
2
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle & CNRS, Bâtiment de Minéralogie, 61 Rue Buffon, 75005 Paris, France
Search for other works by this author on:
Reinhard Kaindl
Reinhard Kaindl
3
Institut für Mineralogie und Petrologie, Karl-Franzens-Universität, A-8010 Graz, Austria
Search for other works by this author on:
Martin A. Ziemann
Martin A. Ziemann
4
Institut für Geowissenschaften – Mineralogie, Universität Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam, Germany
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2004

Abstract

It is said that during a voyage to Europe in the summer of 1921, the Indian physicist Chandrasekhara Venkata Raman (1888–1970) looked at the wonderful blue opalescence of the Mediterranean Sea and questioned where the sea's blue colour came from and why it should be different from the sky's blue. Raman started a series of experiments to address these questions, and he found the blue colour of the sea was not merely due to simple reflection of the sky in water, as most people imagined, but was additionally affected by molecular scattering of light. This led to the discovery of a new inelastic scattering process that is the optical analogue of the “Compton effect”; it is nowadays known as the “Raman effect”. It describes a change in the wavelength of light that occurs when a light beam interacts with molecular vibrations. The possibility for such interaction between matter and light had already been predicted theoretically by Smekal (1923). The first verification was obtained by Raman and Krishnan (1928) in light scattering experiments on liquids. Only two years later, Sir C.V. Raman (who was knighted in 1929) was the Nobel laureate in physics, honoured for his work on the scattering of light and the discovery of the effect named after him. In his Nobel lecture, given on 11th December 1930, Sir C.V. Raman said “The frequency differences determined from the spectra, the width and character of the lines appearing in them, and the intensity and state of polarization of the scattered radiations enable us to obtain an insight into the ultimate structure of the scattering substance. […] It follows that the new field of spectroscopy has practically unrestricted scope in the study of problems related to the structure of matter” In 1948, he founded the Raman Research Institute in Bangalore, India, with funds from private sources.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

European Mineralogical Union Notes in Mineralogy

Spectroscopic methods in mineralogy

Anton Beran
Anton Beran
Search for other works by this author on:
Eugen Libowitzky
Eugen Libowitzky
Search for other works by this author on:
Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland
Volume
6
ISBN electronic:
9780903056519
Publication date:
January 01, 2004

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal