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Book Chapter

Historical surface faulting and paleoseismology of the central Nevada seismic belt

By
S. John Caskey
S. John Caskey
Department of Geosciences, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California, USA
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John W. Bell
John W. Bell
Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Mackay School of Mines, USA University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada
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D. Burton Slemmons
D. Burton Slemmons
2905 Autumn Haze Lane, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2000

Abstract

This three-day field trip will examine the nature of contemporary tectonic processes in the western Basin and Range province by focusing on the historical faulting and paleoseismology of the central Nevada seismic belt (CNSB) (Fig. 1). The trip begins in Reno and includes travel through Fallon, Nevada to major faulting sites in the 1954 Rainbow Mountain, Fairview Peak, and Dixie Valley rupture area ~125 km east of Reno (Fig. 2). The principal topics addressed by this trip will include:

Map showing surface ruptures (bold lines) and focal mechanisms reported for major historical earthquakes of the central Nevada-eastern California seismic belt. Other Quaternary faults of the Basin and Range are shown as thinner lines. Compressional quadrants of focal mechanism are black. Focal mechanisms are from Doser (1986) and the National Earthquake Information Center. Area of Figure 2 is shown by the gray box. Within the central Nevada seismic belt, right-normal-oblique surface ruptures of 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Fairview Peak sequence mark a transition between dominantly right-lateral events to the south within the northwest-trending Walker Lane belt (Stewart, 1988), and the dominantly dip-slip Dixie Valley and Pleasant Valley earthquakes to the north, where the Basin and Range is characterized by a consistent north-to northeast-trending structural grain.

The structural pattern, distribution, and characteristics of surface faulting and secondary effects associated with large-magnitude historical earthquakes as they bear on the nature of modern tectonic processes in the CNSB.

The paleoseismicity of the historical fault zones within

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Contents

GSA Field Guide

Great Basin and Sierra Nevada

David R. Lageson
David R. Lageson
Department of Earth Sciences Montana State University Bozeman, MT 59717 USA
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Stephen G. Peters
Stephen G. Peters
Reno Field Office Mackay School of Mines, MS-176 University of Nevada Reno, Nevada 89557-0047 USA
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Mary M. Lahren
Mary M. Lahren
Department of Geological Sciences MS-l72 University of Nevada Reno, Nevada 89557 USA 2000
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Geological Society of America
Volume
2
ISBN electronic:
9780813756028
Publication date:
January 01, 2000

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