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Abstract

Contributors: Hans AbramsonWard, Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., 2101 Webster St., Suite 1200, Oakland, California 94612, USA; Julie Bawcom, California Geological Survey, 17501 North Highway 101, Willits, California 95490, USA; John Boatwright, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., M.S. 977, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Todd Crampton, Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., 2101 Webster St., Suite 1200, Oakland, California 94612, USA; Wayne Goldberg, City Manager's Office, 100 Santa Rosa Ave., Rm. 10, Santa Rosa, California 95404, USA; Kathryn L.Hanson, Geomatrix Consultants, Inc., 2101 Webster St., Suite 1200, Oakland, California 94612, USA; Victoria E.Langenheim, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., M.S. 989, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; MortLarsen, Department of Geology, Humboldt State University, 1 Harpst St., Arcata, Cali-fornia 95521, USA; Gaye LeBaron, Press Democrat, P.O. Box 569, Santa Rosa, California 95402, USA; Darcy K.McPhee, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., M.S. 989, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; William V. McCormick, Kleinfelder, 2240 Northpoint Parkway, Santa Rosa, California 95407, USA; Robert J. McLaughlin, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., M.S. 973, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Craig A.McCabe, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., M.S. 973, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; David P.Schwartz, U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., M.S. 977, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; GarySimpson, SHN Consulting Engineers and Geologists, 812 W. Wabash Ave., Eureka, California 95501, USA; Frank H. (Bert)Swan, Consulting Geologist, 240 Laidley Street, San Francisco, California 94131, USA

This guidebook is for a two-day trip: the first part (Day 1) takes place in and near the city of Santa Rosa and on the Rodgers Creek fault in Sonoma County; the second part (Day 2) will go to stops in the town of Willits, on the northern Maacama fault, in Mendocino County.

The Rodgers Creek and Maacama faults are major strands of the San Andreas fault system in northern California. The two faults are separated by a right step and may be considered the northern extension of the Hayward and Calaveras faults, which branch from the San Andreas fault south of the San Francisco Bay area (Fig. 1A). This system of faults accommodates almost a quarter of the total right-slip motion between the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. Slip is released in large, episodic earthquakes and, on some faults, such as the northern Maacama fault, by slow, steady creep.

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