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Geology without borders: A conceptual model for Aberdeen Proving Ground

By
Joseph B. Dunbar
Joseph B. Dunbar
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 39180, USA
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Lillian D. Wakeley
Lillian D. Wakeley
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 39180, USA
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S. Paul Miller
S. Paul Miller
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 39180, USA
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Stanley M. Swartzel
Stanley M. Swartzel
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi, 39180, USA
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Published:
January 01, 2001

Abstract

Research by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at numerous military facilities has shown that a regional geologic approach is the key to cost-effective risk assessment and environmental remediation. This approach addresses the needs of the facility by placing it directly in the larger framework of the land, water, and the people off post who comprise potential contaminant receptors. Application of a regional geologic framework to a large military facility requires extensive research and focused study to establish the overall picture.

A regional geologic and geomorphic model was developed for the Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), located in the headwaters of Chesapeake Bay near Aberdeen, Maryland, USA. Regional geologic information and interpretation of data from over 2000 geologic and water well borings indicate that APG is situated upon Pleistocene terraces of the ancestral Susquehanna River, which unconformably overlie Cretaceous unconsolidated sediments. Pleistocene terraces represent estuarine and fluvial filling of an earlier manifestation of Chesapeake Bay during interglacial periods of high sea level during the past 1.5 m.y. During episodes of low sea level, corresponding to glacial maxima, the Susquehanna River downcut into Pleistocene and Cretaceous deposits. The remnants of at least three and possibly four separate filling cycles, ranging from middle Wisconsin to early Pleistocene in age (youngest to oldest), are present at APG. The geologic and geomorphic model of APG is being used to define aquifer limits and to assess the movement of groundwater for potential impacts to public drinking water supplies on the Aberdeen Peninsula and to Chesapeake Bay.

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Contents

GSA Reviews in Engineering Geology

The Environmental Legacy of Military Operations

Judy Ehlen
Judy Ehlen
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 7701 Telegraph Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22315-3864, USA
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Russell S. Harmon
Russell S. Harmon
U.S. Army Research Office, P.O. Box 12211, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709-2211, USA
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Geological Society of America
Volume
14
ISBN electronic:
9780813758145
Publication date:
January 01, 2001

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