Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Methodology for remote characterization of fracture systems in bedrock of enemy underground facilities

By
Robert D. Jacobi
Robert D. Jacobi
Department of Geology, 876 NSC, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Thomas E. Eastler
Thomas E. Eastler
Natural Science Department, University of Maine at Farmington, Farmington, ME 04938, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Jiandong Xu
Jiandong Xu
Department of Geology, 876 NSC, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14260, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2001

Abstract

Weaponry can be conveniently and safely concealed in enemy underground bedrock facilities (UGF). The bedrock environment surrounding UGF offers a high degree of protection for the assets contained within. Physical characteristics of the surrounding bedrock constrain the effects of conventional and even nuclear weapons. Brittle structures in the bedrock such as fracture systems have anisotropic characteristics and present a formidable obstacle to the survival of penetrating weapons. Knowledge of the three-dimensional (3-D) characteristics of bedrock fracture systems in enemy UGF, which may be covered by soil or vegetation, is of paramount importance to the weapons development community in its quest to penetrate anisotropic environments.

We utilize rigorous methodologies to predict fracture characteristics in overburden-covered regions from outcrop, core, borehole, and remote sensing data. We have established digital scanline and scangrid methodologies to characterize fracture geometries. The digital data allow us to easily analyze the fractures in terms of fractal and more advanced geostatistical techniques. We have developed theoretical and practical guidelines for determining the two-dimentional (2-D) density of fractures from one-dimentional (1-D) (scanline) data. Additionally, we have developed theoretical relationships between 2-D and 3-D fracture densities. Integration of digital field data with density and spatial structure of the fracture networks allows us to predict the distribution of fractures in areas removed from the outcrop. These methodologies, once refined, fully tested, and verified, will allow us to characterize three-dimensional fracture systems in potential target areas worldwide by remote sensing means alone.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Reviews in Engineering Geology

The Environmental Legacy of Military Operations

Judy Ehlen
Judy Ehlen
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, 7701 Telegraph Road, Alexandria, Virginia 22315-3864, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Russell S. Harmon
Russell S. Harmon
U.S. Army Research Office, P.O. Box 12211, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709-2211, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
14
ISBN electronic:
9780813758145
Publication date:
January 01, 2001

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal