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Book Chapter

The Gravity Anomaly Map of North America

By
W. F. Hanna
W. F. Hanna
U.S. Geological Survey, 927 National Center, Reston, Virginia 22092
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R. E. Sweeney
R. E. Sweeney
U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225
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T. G. Hildenbrand
T. G. Hildenbrand
U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225
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J. G. Tanner
J. G. Tanner
Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y3, Canada
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R. K. McConnell
R. K. McConnell
Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0Y3, Canada
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R. H. Godson
R. H. Godson
U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225
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Published:
January 01, 1989

Abstract

The recently developed Gravity Anomaly Map of North America is the product of a 12-year multinational effort to compile, critically edit, and merge gravity anomaly data on a continental and global scale (Gravity Anomaly Map Committee, 1987). This color-pixel map is printed on four quadrant sheets at a scale of 1:5,000,000 and includes a fifth sheet showing a color index map and data references. This map is the first at such a global scale to include several hundreds of thousands of precise bits of surface data of Canada, the United States, Mexico, and Central America, as well as other high-quality surface data from neighboring continental and oceanic areas. A 1:20,000,000 version of the map is shown on Plate 1A.

The prospect of producing a gravity anomaly map of North America was formally advanced in 1975 by way of a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Society of Exploration Geophysicists. Before these cooperators linked to specialists of Canada, Mexico, and other countries, they agreed that an updated version of the gravity anomaly map of the United States should first be developed. In 1983, following publication of the U.S. map, the Society of Exploration Geophysicists and the U.S. Geological Survey concluded that the planned Centennial Map Series of the Decade of North American Geology program would be an excellent medium for publication of the gravity anomaly map of North America as well as the magnetic anomaly map of North America. The cooperating groups subsequently coordinated with the Geological Society of America, and the map was published in 1988.

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Figures & Tables

Contents

DNAG, Geology of North America

The Geology of North America—An Overview

Albert W. Bally
Albert W. Bally
Department of GeologyP.O. Box 1892Houston, Texas 77251
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Allison R. Palmer
Allison R. Palmer
Geological Society of America3300 Penrose Place, P.O. Box 9140Boulder, Colorado 80301
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Geological Society of America
Volume
A
ISBN electronic:
9780813754451
Publication date:
January 01, 1989

GeoRef

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