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Geologic framework of the Aleutian arc, Alaska

By
Tracy L. Vallier
Tracy L. Vallier
U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025
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David W. Scholl
David W. Scholl
U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025
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Michael A. Fisher
Michael A. Fisher
U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025
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Terry R. Bruns
Terry R. Bruns
U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025
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Frederic H. Wilson
Frederic H. Wilson
U.S. Geological Survey, 4200 University Drive, Anchorage, Alaska 99508
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Roland von Huene
Roland von Huene
U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025
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Andrew J. Stevenson
Andrew J. Stevenson
U.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Road, Menlo Park, California 94025
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Published:
January 01, 1994

Abstract

The Aleutian arc is the arcuate arrangement of mountain ranges and flanking submerged margins that forms the northern rim of the Pacific Basin from the Kamchatka Peninsula (Russia) eastward more than 3,000 km to Cook Inlet (Fig. 1). It consists of two very different segments that meet near Unimak Pass: the Aleutian Ridge segment to the west and the Alaska Peninsula- Kodiak Island segment to the east. The Aleutian Ridge segment is a massive, mostly submerged cordillera that includes both the islands and the submerged pedestal from which they protrude. The Alaska Peninsula-Kodiak Island segment is composed of the Alaska Peninsula, its adjacent islands, and their continental and insular margins. The Bering Sea margin north of the Alaska Peninsula consists mostly of a wide continental shelf, some of which is underlain by rocks correlative with those on the Alaska Peninsula.

There is no pre-Eocene record in rocks of the Aleutian Ridge segment, whereas rare fragments of Paleozoic rocks and extensive outcrops of Mesozoic rocks occur on the Alaska Peninsula. Since the late Eocene, and possibly since the early Eocene, the two segments have evolved somewhat similarly. Major plutonic and volcanic episodes, however, are not synchronous. Furthermore, uplift of the Alaska Peninsula-Kodiak Island segment in late Cenozoic time was more extensive than uplift of the Aleutian Ridge segment. It is probable that tectonic regimes along the Aleutian arc varied during the Tertiary in response to such factors as the directions and rates of convergence, to bathymetry and age of the subducting

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DNAG, Geology of North America

The Geology of Alaska

George Plafker
George Plafker
U.S. Geological Survey MS 904, 345 Middlefield Road Menlo Park, California 94025
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Henry C. Berg
Henry C. Berg
115 Malvern Avenue Fullerton, California 92632
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Geological Society of America
Volume
G-1
ISBN electronic:
9780813754536
Publication date:
January 01, 1994

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