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Pennsylvanian deformation and Cambro-Ordovician sedimentation in the Blue Creek Canyon, Slick Hills, southwestern Oklahoma

By
R.N. Donovan
R.N. Donovan
Geology Department, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas 76129
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D. Ragland
D. Ragland
Geology Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078
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M. Rafalowski
M. Rafalowski
Geology Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078
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D. McConnell
D. McConnell
Geology Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078
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W. Beauchamp
W. Beauchamp
Geology Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078
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W. R. Martini
W. R. Martini
Geology Department Queens University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland
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D. J. Sanderson
D. J. Sanderson
Geology Department Queens University of Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland
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Published:
January 01, 1988

Abstract

Blue Creek Canyon is located approximately 15 mi (24 km) north-northwest of Lawton in southwestern Oklahoma (T.4N., R.13W.). Oklahoma 58 (Fig. 1) runs through the canyon. The area can be most easily reached from Lawton by taking the Medicine Park exit from the H. E. Bailey Turnpike a few miles north of Lawton.

The entire area described here is part of the Kimbell Ranch, owned by Mr. and Mrs. David Kimbell of Wichita Falls. The ranch house is situated at the south end of the canyon (Fig. 2) and is managed by Charlie Bob and Dixie Oliver. Both the Olivers and the Kimbells have greatly encouraged the visits of geologists, and several local universities use the area as a student training ground. Permission to visit should be sought from Mr. Oliver, and the usual common sense and courtesy extended. The ranch address is Star Route A, Box 124, Lawton, OK 73501. The Olivers carry their interest in geology to a remarkable level; during monitoring of the recently active Meers Fault, they had a seismograph installed in their bedroom as part of a regional network.

The descriptions in this field guide are for a series of walks that start approximately 0.5 mi (0.8 km) north of the ranch house at Red Hill (a small hill of Carlton Rhyolite capped by Post Oak Conglomerate which is immediately west of the road) (Fig. 2). The walks are all rough and fairly hilly; exposure is more or less continuous. The area is well drained

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Contents

DNAG, Centennial Field Guides

South-Central Section of the Geological Society of America

O. T. Hayward
O. T. Hayward
Geology Department, Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798
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Geological Society of America
Volume
4
ISBN electronic:
9780813754109
Publication date:
January 01, 1988

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