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Book Chapter

Metallogenic evolution of the Caribbean region

By
Stephen E. Kesler
Stephen E. Kesler
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
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Enrique Levy
Enrique Levy
25 Calle “A” 12-03, Zona 11, Guatemala, Guatemala
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Cecilia Martín F.
Cecilia Martín F.
Avenida Principal de Cumbres de Curumo, Residencia 680 PH, Caracas 1080, Venezuela
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Published:
January 01, 1991

Abstract

The principal objective of this review is to illustrate the relation between the mineral deposits of the Caribbean region (Fig. 1, Plate 13) and their geologic and tectonic environment. In areas such as the Caribbean, where regional geological data are scarce, the distribution and composition of mineral deposits provides important information on the location and offset of largescale faults and the continuity and relations between dissected terranes. In addition, because the hydrothermal systems that form many mineral deposits scavenge metals from large volumes of surrounding crust, their metal and isotopic compositions can provide useful insights into the characteristics and sources of these rocks, including deeper, unexposed parts of the crust. To illustrate the relation between mineral deposits and their geologic framework, it is necessary to use a genetic (or modelbased) classification of mineral deposits rather than simply a commodity or element-based system. Readers unfamiliar with the deposit models used here should consult Guilbert and Park (1986) or Jensen and Bateman (1979). Caribbean mineral deposits fit easily into commonly used models, with a few exceptions. The most important of these exceptions are the deposits found in the Cobre Formation of eastern Cuba and the Wagwater belt of Jamaica, which exhibit a close relation to the tectonic evolution of the region, as discussed below. In preparing this review, a strong effort was made to incorporate Cuban mineral deposits, although much of the literature on these deposits lack observations of the type needed to classify the deposits.

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Contents

DNAG, Geology of North America

The Caribbean Region

Gabriel Dengo
Gabriel Dengo
Gabriel Dengo Centro de Estudios Geológicos de América Central Apartado 468 Guatemala City, Guatemala
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J.E. Case
J.E. Case
U.S. Geological Survey 345 Middlefield Road Menlo Park, California 94025
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Geological Society of America
Volume
H
ISBN electronic:
9780813754567
Publication date:
January 01, 1991

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