Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Caribbean marine geology; Active margins of the plate boundary

By
John W. Ladd
John W. Ladd
Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory of Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964
Search for other works by this author on:
Troy L. Holcombe
Troy L. Holcombe
Marine Geology and Geophysics Division, National Geophysical Data Center, 325 Broadway, Boulder, Colorado 80303
Search for other works by this author on:
Graham K. Westbrook
Graham K. Westbrook
School of Earth Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, England
Search for other works by this author on:
N. Terence Edgar
N. Terence Edgar
Office of Energy and Marine Geology, U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 22092
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1991

Abstract

The margins of the Caribbean plate are characterized by varying amounts of strike-slip faulting and compressional folding, thrusting, warping, and extensional faulting. The Cayman Trough is a predominantly strike-slip transform boundary except for a short segment of a spreading ridge (Macdonald and Holcombe, 1978; Holcombe and Sharman, 1983). The Barbados Ridge- Lesser Antilles Arc system and the Middle America Trench-Central America Arc system are predominantly compressional, convergent boundaries. The other boundaries have experienced Neogene strike-slip faulting, compression, and extension across a broad plate boundary zone. Because we are dealing with several rigid plates in relative motion with respect to each other, we believe that the Neogene pattern has undergone slow secondorder changes with time (Dewey, 1975). The Neogene and Quaternary pattern has been quite different from Paleogene and Cretaceous patterns of plate boundary organization and deformation (Ladd, 1976; Pindell and Dewey, 1982; Pindell and Barrett, this volume). In this chapter we will review the northern, southern, and eastern boundaries of the Caribbean; the western boundary with the Cocos plate is reviewed only briefly here and more fully in the eastern Pacific volume (von Huene, 1989). Place names referred to in this chapter can be found in Plate 1.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

DNAG, Geology of North America

The Caribbean Region

Gabriel Dengo
Gabriel Dengo
Gabriel Dengo Centro de Estudios Geológicos de América Central Apartado 468 Guatemala City, Guatemala
Search for other works by this author on:
J.E. Case
J.E. Case
U.S. Geological Survey 345 Middlefield Road Menlo Park, California 94025
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
H
ISBN electronic:
9780813754567
Publication date:
January 01, 1991

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal