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Book Chapter

The Influence of the Quaternary Geology of Canada on Man’S Environment

By
J-Y. Chagnon
J-Y. Chagnon
Groupe de recherche en géologie de l’ingénieurDépartement de géologieUniversité LavalSte. Foy, QuébecG1K 7P4
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S.G. Evans
S.G. Evans
Geological Survey of Canada601 Booth StreetOttawa, OntarioK1A 0E8
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J.S. Gardner
J.S. Gardner
Department of GeographyFaculty of Environmental SciencesUniversity of WaterlooWaterloo, OntarioN2L 3G1
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L.E. Jackson, Jr.
L.E. Jackson, Jr.
Geological Survey of Canada100 West Pender StreetVancouver, British ColumbiaV6B 1R8
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J. Locat
J. Locat
Groupe de recherche en géologie de l’ingénieurDépartement de géologieUniversité LavalSte. Foy, QuébecG1K 7P4
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J.S. Scott
J.S. Scott
Geological Survey of Canada601 Booth StreetOttawa, OntarioK1A 0E8
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O.L. White
O.L. White
Ontario Geological Survey77 Grenville StreetToronto, OntarioM7A 1W4
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Published:
January 01, 1989

Abstract

Quaternary geology and geomorphology play a major role in controlling the nature and distribution of surface materials and in controlling the processes active at the surface. Consequently Quaternary geology and geomorphology influence the pattern of man’s land use activities and are valuable in determining where geological hazards might occur.

High relief, steep slopes, past and present glaciation, seismic activity, and a montane climatic regime make mass wasting processes ubiquitous geological hazards in the Cordillera. These range in increasing magnitude and decreasing frequency from low magnitude rockfall, which may be a daily occurrence during the spring and summer, through debris flow, which may have a recurrence frequency of 20 years or less, to debris avalanches in excess of 106 m3. Only eleven of these latter events have been recorded in the southern Canadian Cordillera during the historic period. Alpine areas have the additional hazard of snow avalanches which have high recurrence frequencies, large volumes, and move at high velocities. All of these hazards can be most economically managed through identification of hazardous areas and avoidance of them. Except for large debris avalanches, protective structures are generally an effective protection if it is necessary to make use of a hazardous area. In the case of avalanches, forecasting and induced release are additional effective management techniques.

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Contents

DNAG, Geology of North America

Quaternary Geology of Canada and Greenland

R.J. Fulton
R.J. Fulton
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Geological Society of America
Volume
K1
ISBN electronic:
9780813754604
Publication date:
January 01, 1989

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