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Quaternary Geology of the Canadian Cordillera

By
J.J. Clague
J.J. Clague
Geological Survey of Canada100 West Pender StreetVancouver, British CoumbiaV6B 1R8
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W.H. Mathews
W.H. Mathews
Department of Geological SciencesUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouver, British ColumbiaV6T 1W5
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J.M. Ryder
J.M. Ryder
Department of GeographyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouver, BritishColumbiaV6T 1W5
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O.L. Hughes
O.L. Hughes
Geological Survey of Canada3303-33rd Street N.W.Calgary, AlbertaT2L 2A7
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N.W. Rutter
N.W. Rutter
Department of GeologyUniversity of AlbertaEdmonton, AlbertaT6G 2E3
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L.E. Jackson, Jr.
L.E. Jackson, Jr.
Geological Survey of Canada100 West Pender StreetVancouver, British ColumbiaV6B 1R8
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J.V. Matthews, Jr.
J.V. Matthews, Jr.
Geological Survey of Canada601 Booth StreetOttawa, OntarioK1A 0E8
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G.M. MacDonald
G.M. MacDonald
Department of GeographyMcMaster UniversityHamilton, OntarioL8S 4K1
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Published:
January 01, 1989

Abstract

The Canadian Cordillera, the westernmost of the major physiographic and geological regions of Canada, is an area of rugged mountains, plateaus, lowlands, valleys, and seaways. This region extends from the International Boundary on the south to Beaufort Sea on the north and from Pacific Ocean and Alaska on the west to the Interior Plains on the east, a land area in excess of 1 500 000 km2.

The Canadian Cordillera is located at the edge of the America lithospheric plate and consists of the deformed western margin of the North American craton and a collage of crustal fragments, or terranes, that were accreted to the craton and subsequently fragmented and displaced northward along major strike-slip faults. These processes have given the Cordillera a strong northwest-southeast structural grain and are largely responsible for the present complex distribution of rocks, faults, and other structures in the region.

The distribution of earthquakes, active and recently active faults, and young volcanoes in the Canadian Cordillera is controlled by the motions of the Pacific, America, Juan de Fuca, and Explorer plates and Winona Block which are in contact in the northeast Pacific Ocean west of British Columbia. Most large earthquakes and active faults are associated with offshore plate boundaries beyond the British Columbia continental margin; some, however, occur on the continental shelf and on land. Most Quaternary volcanoes are located in four narrow belts that constitute

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Contents

DNAG, Geology of North America

Quaternary Geology of Canada and Greenland

R.J. Fulton
R.J. Fulton
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Geological Society of America
Volume
K1
ISBN electronic:
9780813754604
Publication date:
January 01, 1989

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