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Quaternary geology of the Colorado Plateau

By
Peter C. Patton
Peter C. Patton
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut 06457
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Norma Biggar
Norma Biggar
Woodward-Clyde Consultants, 500 12th Street, Suite 100, Oakland, California 94607
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Christopher D. Condit
Christopher D. Condit
Department of Geology and Geography, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003
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Mary L. Gillam
Mary L. Gillam
Department of Geological Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309
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David W. Love
David W. Love
New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, New Mexico 87801
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Michael N. Machette
Michael N. Machette
U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225
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Larry Mayer
Larry Mayer
Geology Department, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056
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Roger B. Morrison
Roger B. Morrison
Morrison and Associates, 13150 West Ninth Avenue, Golden, Colorado 80401
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John N. Rosholt
John N. Rosholt
U.S. Geological Survey, Box 25046, Denver Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225
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Published:
January 01, 1991

Abstract

The Colorado Plateau differs greatly from its neighboring physiographic provinces, the Rocky Mountains on the north and east, and the Basin and Range Province on the west and south. The Colorado Plateau is a huge (about 384,000 km2), roughly circular region of many high plateaus and isolated mountains that encompasses large parts of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico, and Arizona. The plateau derives its name from the Colorado River, which drains at least 90 percent of its area (Fig. 1).

The distinguishing features of the Colorado Plateau are: its considerable altitude, nearly all above 1,500 m; its nearhorizontal bedrock (steeply inclined beds are limited to the few great monoclines and the borders of certain uplifts); and its strong stepped landscapes, consisting of many cliff-like escarpments separated by wide, gentle slopes (the result of differential erosion of the generally flat-lying rocks).

The plateau consists of six sections (Fenneman, 1931). Different bedrock stratigraphy and structure have profoundly affected the physiography and geomorphology of each section (Fig. 1).

The northern section of the Colorado Plateau consists of the Uinta basin, a broad structural basin bounded on the north by the Uinta Mountains and on the south by the San Rafael swell (Figs. 1 and 2). The east-flowing Duchesne River and the west-flowing White River drain the basin, and both join the south-flowing Green River near Ouray, Utah. The Green River has cut Desolation Canyon where the river flows across the southern rim of the.

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Contents

DNAG, Geology of North America

Quaternary Nonglacial Geology

Roger B. Morrison
Roger B. Morrison
Morrison and Associates 13150 West Ninth Avenue Golden, Colorado 80401
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Geological Society of America
Volume
K-2
ISBN electronic:
9780813754611
Publication date:
January 01, 1991

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