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The Lovers Leap section and related observations of multiple and cross-cutting glacial drifts in the Great Bend area, Indiana

By
N. K. Bleuer
N. K. Bleuer
Department of Geology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47401Indiana Geological Survey, 611 North Walnut Grove, Bloomington, Indiana 47405
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Robert H. Shaver
Robert H. Shaver
Department of Geology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47401Indiana Geological Survey, 611 North Walnut Grove, Bloomington, Indiana 47405
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Published:
January 01, 1987

Abstarct

The glacial geology of the area north of the Great Bend of the Wabash River in west-central Indiana (Fig.1), 1) illustrates important early developed principles regarding multiple continentalglaciation, the movements of adjoining ice lobes, and the interrelated deposits. Perhaps the first documentation of a lithologically definable till stratigraphy that is basic to interpretation of glacial movement and sedimentation throughout much of the Midwest was made in the Great Bend area. A half century after the first documentation was made, the till stratigraphy here would emerge as the regionally mappable sequence. Further, it would illustrate cross-cutting relationships of morainal ridges andthe interbedding of multiple-source deposits. Here, therefore, is a clear demonstration of how deposits first classified on the basis of surface morphology relate to those that are classifiable on a mappable, till-stratigraphy basis.

Four vantage points in the Great Bend area are particularly focal for illustration ofthe basic concepts that are addressed here.Foremost is the Lovers Leap section (also known historically as the Stone Creek section), which is exposed on the northwest side of Big Pine Creek, a Wabash River tributary, 4 mi (6.4 km) north of Williamsport, Warren County, Indiana, NW¼NW¼ NW¼Sec.23, T.22N., R.8W., Williamsport 7½-minute Quadrangle (Fig. 2d), 2D). Here well exposed are three superimposed tills and other drift materials that a pioneer of continental-glaciation theories, Thomas Chrowder Chamberlain, used to demonstrate his beliefs. In fact, our Figure 3 is taken from Chamberlin’s contribution to James Geike’s ( 1894) The Great Ice Age and was

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DNAG, Centennial Field Guides

North-Central Section of the Geological Society of America

Geological Society of America
Volume
3
ISBN electronic:
9780813754093
Publication date:
January 01, 1987

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