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Book Chapter

Tectonic history of the Blue Ridge, north-central Virginia

By
Christopher M. Bailey
Christopher M. Bailey
Department of Geology, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187, USA
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Scott Southworth
Scott Southworth
U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192, USA
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Richard P. Tollo
Richard P. Tollo
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. 20052, USA
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Published:
October 06, 2006

Abstract

The Blue Ridge province in north-central Virginia forms a large basement massif at the hinterland edge of the central Appalachian fold-and-thrust belt. Rocks and structures exposed in the Blue Ridge record a long tectonic history that encompasses the Mesoproterozoic Grenvillian orogen, Neoproterozoic Iapetan crustal extension, multiple Paleozoic collisional events, and Mesozoic tectonism. The purpose of this field trip is to provide an overview of Blue Ridge tectonics, highlight the findings of recent studies, and discuss the outstanding questions that remain unanswered in Blue Ridge geology. The trip will traverse the Blue Ridge from southeast to northwest and includes stops along the Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park and the Shenandoah Valley.

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