Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Environmental Aspects of Marsh Gases

By
F. M. Swain
F. M. Swain
1
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
2
University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware.
Search for other works by this author on:
B. D. Johnson
B. D. Johnson
1
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Search for other works by this author on:
J. J. Pittman
J. J. Pittman
2
University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware.
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 1977

Abstract

Marsh gas samples collected from fresh-water marshes in Minnesota, Louisiana and Delaware, having waters near neutrality and weakly negative to weakly positive Eh, yielded larger methane flows than brackish water and salt-water marshes in Delaware and Louisiana with more negative Eh values. Carbon dioxide, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, and propane are other common constituees of the marsh gases. Hydrogen sulfide is less abundant in the fresh-water than in the brackish and salt-water marshes. Other marsh conditions relating,to methane genesis include salinity, sulfate content, turbidity, rainfall, tidal action, and source material.

You do not currently have access to this article.

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Microform Publications

Interdisciplinary Studies of Peat and Coal Origins

P. H. Given
P. H. Given
Search for other works by this author on:
A. D. Cohen
A. D. Cohen
Search for other works by this author on:
Geological Society of America
Volume
7
ISBN electronic:
9780813759074
Publication date:
January 01, 1977

GeoRef

References

Related

Citing Books via

Close Modal
This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

Close Modal
Close Modal