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Book Chapter

Morphological and Microchemical Correlations of Living and Fossil Botryococcus

By
Karl J. Niklas
Karl J. Niklas
1
The New York Botanical Garden New York.
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Tom L. Phillips
Tom L. Phillips
2
Department of Botany, University of Illinois Urbana , IL 61801
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Published:
January 01, 1977

Abstract

The morphological variation of living colonies of green algae of the genus Botryococcus, as induced by pH, [hv], agitation and [NH4+] regimes,'allows for the mathematical designation of boundary conditions referable to these parameters in the environment:

 
formula

Vt = volume of colony, v = cell volume and k = 2.0. Fossil algal morphologies may be used to predict ecological parameters prior to fossilisation. Cannel and boghead coal types mathematically cluster as referable to low Y, low [hv] or high [NH4 ], and high Y, low [hv] or high [NH4 ] conditions in the growth phase of included thalli, respectively. Transmission electron micrographs correlated with enzyme catalysis relate the cytoplasmic location of microchemical fractions with the sheath having a chitin (40-44%) - hydrocarbon (56-60%) composition. Thirteen hydrocarbon constituents of 39 sapropelic coals are related to algal biosynthesis; , The presence of the "I-peak" is shown to correlate with the relative age of the coal sample. A chemosynthetif scheme is proposed relating differential microchemical preservation to post-fossilization reactions during coal formation. Multivariant statistical analyses correlate mprphology and chemistry of fossil thalli with coal type. Cannel coals are shown to differ from boghead coals in having a greater influx of lignin-degradation products from associated vascular flora (14-18% of the coal matrix is derivable from condensation reactions of vanillan, vanillic and protocatechuic acids). Algal cells accumulated under anaerobic and reducing conditions with transport conditions resulting in high Y and slower degradation. A reducing to oxidizing transition J.S, suggested by chemosynthetic flow models causing polymerization of humic gels and phenolic plant derivatives.

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Contents

GSA Microform Publications

Interdisciplinary Studies of Peat and Coal Origins

P. H. Given
P. H. Given
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A. D. Cohen
A. D. Cohen
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Geological Society of America
Volume
7
ISBN electronic:
9780813759074
Publication date:
January 01, 1977

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