Skip to Main Content
Book Chapter

Geotechnical aspects in the epicentral region of the 2011 Mw 5.8 Mineral, Virginia, earthquake

By
Russell A. Green
Russell A. Green
The Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 120B Patton Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Samuel Lasley
Samuel Lasley
The Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 117B Patton Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Mark W. Carter
Mark W. Carter
U.S. Geological Survey, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, Virginia 20192-0002, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Jeffrey W. Munsey
Jeffrey W. Munsey
Tennessee Valley Authority, 400 West Summit Hill Drive, Knoxville, Tennessee 37902, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Brett W. Maurer
Brett W. Maurer
The Charles E. Via, Jr. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 117B Patton Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Martitia P. Tuttle
Martitia P. Tuttle
M. Tuttle & Associates, P.O. Box 345, Georgetown, Maine 04548, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Published:
January 01, 2015

A reconnaissance team documented the geotechnical and geological aspects in the epicentral region of the Mw (moment magnitude) 5.8 Mineral, Virginia (USA), earthquake of 23 August 2011. Tectonically and seismically induced ground deformations, evidence of liquefaction, rock slides, river bank slumps, ground subsidence, performance of earthen dams, damage to public infrastructure and lifelines, and other effects of the earthquake were documented. This moderate earthquake provided the rare opportunity to collect data to help assess current geoengineering practices in the region, as well as to assess seismic performance of the aging infrastructure in the region. Ground failures included two marginal liquefaction sites, a river bank slump, four minor rockfalls, and a ~4-m-wide, ~12-m-long, ~0.3-m-deep subsidence on a residential property. Damage to lifelines included subsidence of the approaches for a bridge and a water main break to a heavily corroded, 5-cm-diameter valve in Mineral, Virginia. Observed damage to dams, landfills, and public-use properties included a small, shallow slide in the temporary (“working”) clay cap of the county landfill, damage to two earthen dams (one in the epicentral region and one further away near Bedford, Virginia), and substantial structural damage to two public school buildings.

You do not currently have access to this article.
Don't already have an account? Register

Figures & Tables

Contents

GSA Special Papers

The 2011 Mineral, Virginia, Earthquake, and Its Significance for Seismic Hazards in Eastern North America

J. Wright Horton, Jr.
J. Wright Horton, Jr.
U.S. Geological Survey, MS 926A, 12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, Reston, Virginia 20192, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Martin C. Chapman
Martin C. Chapman
Department of Geosciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 4044 Derring Hall, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
Russell A. Green
Russell A. Green
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (MC 0105), 120B Patton Hall, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 750 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061, USA
Search for other works by this author on:
The Geological Society of America
Volume
509
ISBN print:
9780813725093
Publication date:
January 01, 2015

References

Related

A comprehensive resource of eBooks for researchers in the Earth Sciences

This Feature Is Available To Subscribers Only

Sign In or Create an Account

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

View Article Abstract & Purchase Options

For full access to this pdf, sign in to an existing account, or purchase an annual subscription.

Subscribe Now